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reparations



  • What Is Owed: The Limits of Darity and Mullen's Case For Reparations

    by William P. Jones

    A historian argues that a recent and influential book calling for reparations could strengthen its case by considering the arguments made by historians about the connections of American slavery to other manifestations of racism. What's needed is to link reparations to a global overturning of racial inequality.



  • What White Colleges Owe Black Colleges

    by Adam Harris

    "Private money alone won’t save Black colleges, but, perhaps, money from predominantly white institutions can — and it might be those colleges’ responsibility to provide that aid."



  • Her Family Owned Slaves. How Can She Make Amends?

    "For almost three years now, with the fervor of the newly converted, Ms. Marshall has been on a quest that from the outside may seem quixotic and even naïve. She is diving into her family’s past and trying to chip away at racism in the Deep South, where every white family with roots here benefited from slavery and almost every Black family had enslaved ancestors."



  • California’s Novel Attempt at Land Reparations

    Los Angeles County will return title to land that once was "Bruce's Beach," one of the only Southern California oceanfront resorts welcoming Black visitors, to the descendants of the owners from whom the property was taken by eminent domain in 1927.



  • Cherokee Nation Policies after the Civil War Show that Reparations Work

    by Melinda C. Miller

    Black Freedmen and their families who were able to claim land under treaties made by the Cherokee Nation were much better able to acquire and retain land than African Americans elsewhere, suggesting that the failure of the Reconstruction-era government to advance a reparation policy was a missed opportunity to advance racial justice.



  • What Manhattan Beach, Calif., Says About Reparations

    "When a wealthy, liberal California town can’t bring itself to even apologize for seizing land from Black residents a century ago, it underscores what a long road lies ahead for justice and reconciliation."



  • Higher Education's Racial Reckoning Reaches Far Beyond Slavery

    by Davarian L. Baldwin

    American universities have grown in harmony with American racism throughout their history, from building on land appropriated from Native Americans to accommodating Jim Crow to promoting social science theories that justified segregation and directly encouraging gentrification through real estate purchasing.