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photography



  • The Second Destruction of Tulsa's Black Community

    by Karlos K. Hill

    Photographer Donald Thompson has set out to capture a visual history of Tulsa's Greenwood district, an African American community decimated first by the 1921 race massacre and then by urban renewal in the 1970s. Historian Karlos Hill interviews him about his work. 



  • Met Acquires Landmark Photo Archive of NY Black Life

    “[James Van Der Zee] is a central figure, a significant artist, in telling the story of people of African descent,” said Thelma Golden, director and chief curator of the Studio Museum. “The photographs are testaments to beauty and power, and he captured the Harlem community and the African American community in all its possibilities.”



  • The Captive Photograph

    by Ariella Azoulay

    The taking of photographs of enslaved people by Harvard scientist Louis Agassiz, and the university's continued ownership of those images, constitute a crime against humanity, argues a theorist and historian of visual culture. The images demand an ethic of care to replace an ethic of ownership, which is a model for restorative justice for slavery.



  • The Photographers Who Captured the Great Depression

    Intended as a promotional program for New Deal agricultural programs, the Farm Security Adminstration's sponsorship of Gordon Parks, Walker Evans, Dorothea Lange and other photographers sparked an aesthetic revolution. 



  • How the 'New Woman' Blazed a Trail of Empowerment

    A new retrospective examines the artistic production of women at the intersections of new photographic technology and rising currents of racism and antisemitism in early 20th-century Europe. 



  • How the George Floyd Uprising Was Framed for White Eyes

    Some of the most iconic news photographs of the Civil Rights Movement told a particular story to white liberals – that Black protesters were passive victims needing their help, instead of actively fighting for freedom. Those photos today help define the mainstream limits of "acceptable" protest. 



  • "The 1921 Tulsa Race Massacre: A Photographic History"

    Historian Karlos K. Hill discusses his new book, a compilation of photographs of the Greenwood section of Tulsa before, during, and after the 1921 racist pogrom against the "Black Wall Street." 


  • Reverberations of the Photography of Jazz

    by Jeffrey Mifflin

    The photographs of William Gottlieb and other observers of jazz's golden age deserve more attention for capturing and creating the aesthetics of the music.