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baseball



  • Baseball's Lockout Shows the Growing Power of Labor

    by Gwendolyn Lockman

    "In many ways, the twists and turns of baseball’s labor battle over salaries, pensions and more have reflected the ebbs and flows of labor power in the United States."



  • MLB Passed on the Chance to Stop the Drain of African American Players from Baseball

    by Lou Moore

    Major League Baseball noticed that the trend of increased Black participation in the pro game was making a sharp U-turn as early as the mid-1970s. MLB ignored the advice of many Black players, managers and scouts to reach out to African American youth to protect the diversity and quality of the game. 



  • The Violent Origin Story of Dodger Stadium

    by Ranjani Chakraborty and Melissa Hirsch

    Through interviews with several former residents of the area, Vox explores the story of their neighborhoods razed to make room for Dodger Stadium. It’s one that’s often missing from the history of Los Angeles and has created a double-edged relationship for some Dodger fans. Features commentary by historian Priscilla Leiva. 



  • Clark Griffith Was Too Cheap To Integrate Baseball

    Washington Senators owner Clark Griffith did not seize the opportunity to bring the Black superstars who played for the Homestead Grays in the nation's capital, or the District's enthusiastic Black baseball fans, into the Major League fold. Was bigotry or cheapness to blame? 



  • Justice for the Negro Leagues Will Mean More Than Just Stats

    Major League Baseball will incorporate player records from various Negro League competitions in its official statistics. Black players denied the chance to play in the segregated Major Leagues will now be listed among the official all-time greats, but will this move actually raise awareness of the political and social forces that kept the game segregated?



  • What Counts, These Days, In Baseball?

    by David Henkin

    A cultural historian considers recent baseball controversies in light of new books on the sport, and concludes that ideas of fair competition have much more to do with our social context than fans acknowledge. 



  • Curt Flood Belongs in the Hall of Fame

    Sportswriter Jemele Hill makes the case for Curt Flood as an advocate for the labor rights of ballplayers and especially the right of players of color to be paid for their skill, even at the cost of being blackballed from the game. 



  • Henry Aaron and American Memory

    by Robert Greene II

    "The memories of Jackie Robinson and Henry Aaron, two Americans reviled by many of their compatriots during their playing days but embraced by virtually everyone now, are but the sports phase of a nationwide problem—the problem of properly remembering a painful past."



  • “White Fragility” Gets Jackie Robinson's Story Wrong

    by Peter Dreier

    In an effort to define the Major League Color Line as an artifact of white prejudice, Robin DiAngelo obscures the fact that Jackie Robinson was part of a broad protest movement by Black activists and some white allies to demand and achieve integration of professional baseball.