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books



  • In Praise of Search Tools

    by Diedre Lynch

    Books by Dennis Duncan and Craig Robertson examine the history of indexing, filing, and other technologies for locating information in books and the resultant culture of research.



  • A Descent into Textual Paranoia

    by Christopher S. Celenza

    "Doing one's own research" in an environment of proliferating information and few gatekeepers isn't new to the internet age. 



  • Leonard Moore: On Teaching Black History to White People

    Dr. Leonard Moore of the University of Texas, author of the new "Teaching Black History to White People," discusses the challenges of teaching about racism in America, both from conservatives who often demand "colorblindness" and elements of the "woke left" who often demand intellectual safety.



  • The US is Not a "Nation of Immigrants" (Excerpt)

    by Roxanne Dunbar-Ortiz

    Celebrations of multiculturalism obscure the country’s settler colonial history—and the role that immigrants play in perpetuating it, argues Roxanne Dunbar-Ortiz in a new book excerpted here.



  • Where America Went Wrong in Afghanistan (Review Essay)

    by Fredrik Logevall

    "It will be up to historians of the future, writing with broad access to official documents and with the kind of detachment that only time brings, to fully explain the remarkable early-morning scene at Bagram and all that led up to it. But there’s much we can already learn — abundant material is available."



  • Looking for Nat Turner

    Christopher Tomlins' new book takes seriously the apocalyptic Christianity of Nat Turner, viewing it not as a metaphor for liberation but a key part of how Turner understood freedom. 



  • Elizabeth Hinton: Unearthing the Roots of Black Rebellion

    Elizabeth Hinton's new book argues that anti-police uprisings, commonly called "riots," were frequent and widespread in American Black communities in the 1960s, and should be understood as a political movement against inequality and the inherently abusive nature of the "war on crime."