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international relations



  • Coronavirus Shows the Perils and Promise of Globalization

    by Samuel Zipp

    During the first age of “America First” in the 1940s, Wendell Wilkie's campaign challenged Americans to confront a discomfiting idea: Our lives depend on the well-being of many millions across the world.


  • Do Morals Matter in Foreign Policy?

    by Joseph S. Nye, Jr.

    Examining 14 presidencies since 1945 shows that a radically skeptical view of morality is bad history. Morals did matter.


  • Great Britain’s Secret Role in Prodding a Reluctant U.S. to Superpower Status

    by James Thornton Harris

    America’s rapid emergence as a global superpower after 1945 is the subject of Grand Improvisation: America Confronts the British Superpower 1945-1957. Author Derek Leebaert challenges the conventional wisdom that an exhausted Great Britain voluntarily “handed the baton” of world leadership to the U.S. after World War II. 



  • American Brexit

    by Tom Engelhardt

    It’s Not Just Britain Headed for the Subbasement of Imperial History.



  • Preventing an Israeli-Iran War

    by Alon Ben-Meir

    The EU is in a unique position to prevent the outbreak of a war between Israel and Iran that could engulf the Middle East in a war that no one can win.



  • Kenneth Waltz, international relations theory giant, dies at 88

    Kenneth N. Waltz, a pre-eminent thinker on international relations who was known for his contrarian, debate-provoking ideas, not least his view that stability in the Middle East might be better served if Iran had a nuclear weapon, died on May 12 in Manhattan. He was 88.The cause was complications from pneumonia, said Columbia University, where Mr. Waltz was a senior research scholar.Leslie H. Gelb, emeritus president of the Council on Foreign Relations, characterized Mr. Waltz as one of five “giants” who shaped the study of international relations as a discrete discipline, the others being Hans Morgenthau, Henry A. Kissinger, Samuel P. Huntington and Zbigniew Brzezinski.The field developed in the 1950s, when the experiences of two world wars and the beginning of the cold war drove scholars to try to explain more precisely how nations interacted. The goal was to build a conceptual framework on which international politics could be analyzed, something earlier courses on military and diplomatic history had not offered....