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colonialism



  • What's New and Not in the NYT Haiti Blockbuster

    by Jonathan M. Katz

    What can be taken away from the battle erupting between journalists and historians over the Times's blockbuster news event on Haiti's post-independence forced ransom? 



  • Palm Oil is Colonialism's Continuing Nightmare

    by Max Haiven

    The extraction and trade in palm oil in west Africa has been at the center of two centuries of exploitation and violence, which stands to get worse as the Ukraine war threatens the world supply of competing sunflower oil. 



  • Texas's Anti-Transgender Policies Erase the State's Indigenous Transgender History

    by Gregory D. Smithers

    The prominent role of what would now be called transgender individuals in indigenous societies in Texas was part of the justification Europeans claimed to colonize the land; students compelled to learn Texas history in school could learn a much more inclusive set of stories. 



  • We're Talking about Climate Change with Outdated Colonial Language

    by Priya Satia

    The dominant climate activist theme of sacrificing in the present to protect the future is rooted in the intellectual history of economics which has driven the profligate consumption and gross inequality that threatens the planet. 



  • Review: The Afterlife of Black Hawk

    by David Roediger

    A suppressed history of conquest and expulsion pervades the state of Illinois; A new book seeks to recover it.   



  • We, The Abuser State

    by Jules Gill-Peterson

    Texas's announcement of a policy defining some support for transgender youth as "child abuse" echoes the abuses of colonial authorities on gendered minority groups. 



  • The Reparations Fight Must Include Costs of Climate Change

    by Olúfẹ́mi O. Táíwò

    The movement for reparations should be informed by the broader politics of anticolonial liberation struggles which sought not just to transfer resources but to raise new questions about the basic organiation of societies on a global scale.



  • What are Frantz Fanon's Lessons for Today?

    by Pankaj Mishra

    Taken at the moment of the Algerian fight for independence and other colonial liberation movements, "The Wretched of the Earth" was first seen as a beacon of liberatory thought. A new edition frames the ambivalences in Fanon's work on freedom.



  • David Olusoga: Support Historians in Culture War Crosshairs

    “These new history wars have the warped logic of a witch trial; their aim is to convince people that they are being oppressed by the irrefutable facts of their own national histories, such as slavery in America, or the British Empire,” University of Manchester historian David Olusoga said.



  • Are Native Land Acknowledgments Empty Gestures?

    by Graeme Wood

    Too often, says Atlantic writer Graeme Wood, the rote ackowledgment by a speaker that an event is taking place on land historically occupied by an indigenous people is an empty gesture that short-circuits discussion of Native demands.



  • Utopia’s Settler Colonialism Problem

    by Jessica Namakkal

    The commune movements of the 1960s counterculture were organized around a number of pernicious assumptions about indigenous people and the prerogatives of whites to settle and reorganize land. 



  • The Last Emperor of Mexico (Review)

    As the younger brother of the Austrian emperor, Archduke Ferdinand Maximilian was a perfect figurehead for Napoleon III of France's efforts to create a puppet regime in Mexico. Things didn't go the way he hoped.