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Native American history



  • What Doomed a Sprawling City Near St. Louis 1,000 Years Ago?

    New research shows little evidence that the civilization centered around Cahokia in the Mississippi valley caused its own demise by environmental mismanagement, indicating that perhaps "stories of great civilizations seemingly laid low by ecological hubris may say more about our current anxieties and assumptions than the archaeological record."



  • Tribes Want Medals Awarded for Wounded Knee Massacre Rescinded

    "To date, the nation has awarded more than 3,500 Medals of Honor, including about 400 to soldiers who fought during campaigns against Native Americans.... no medals awarded for service in the Indian campaigns have been revoked."



  • The Fruit of Power

    Raoul Peck's documentary "Exterminate All The Brutes" considers not just the history of settler colonialism, but the epistemology of history in contexts where the powerful seek to shape knowledge. 



  • Return the National Parks to the Tribes

    by David Treuer

    "The idea of a virgin American wilderness—an Eden untouched by humans and devoid of sin—is an illusion" that has hidden the forced removal of Native people from the lands converted to national parks. Native people should tend and protect the land again.



  • Don’t Cancel John Muir (But Don't Excuse Him Either)

    Reckoning with John Muir's legacy of racial prejudice isn't just about imposing moral purity, it's about rethinking the conservation movement to include the broad coalition of humanity needed to protect natural resources. 



  • As the Country Reckons with Race, Will Tribal Nations Lead the Way?

    by Alaina E. Roberts

    The decision of the Cherokee Nation to accept obligations conferred by treaty to honor the citizenship claims of descendants of Black people enslaved by the Cherokee accepts reckoning with past injustices as a tribal strength instead of a liability. 


  • America Does Have an "Original Sin": A Response to James Goodman

    by Joshua Ward Jeffery

    "Original Sin" is a fit metaphor for longstanding inequities in American society, but it's important to understand that the original sin is settler colonialism and the seizure of indigenous land, which American civic religion has been all too willing to accommodate. 


  • Why Deb Haaland Matters

    by Michael Leroy Oberg and Joel Helfrich

    New Interior Secretary Deb Haaland's nomination signals a hopeful turn for "those who value the environment and appreciate the 172-year long historic relationship between Interior and America's Native Nations."



  • John Muir in Native America

    by Rebecca Solnit

    John Muir's conservationist vision erased the historical and ongoing presence of indigenous people on the land. Can the environmental movement and the national parks change direction? 



  • Washington History Seminar TODAY: Claudio Saunt's "Unworthy Republic"

    Please join the National History Center of the American Historical Association for a Washington History Seminar roundtable on Unworthy Republic: The Dispossession of Native Americans and the Road to Indian Territory with author Claudio Saunt. TODAY 4:00 PM EST



  • Why is Charles Curtis's Legacy So Complicated?

    by Kiara M. Vigil

    VP Charles Curtis advocated for policies toward Native American nations that today seem steeped in paternalist and assimilationist values, but in the context of the 1920s his legacy should be seen as part of debate among Native leaders about the tension between preservation and incorporation of modern American society.