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patriarchy



  • How Toxic is Masculinity, and Whose Job Is it to Fix It?

    Historian Ivan Jablonka's history of the idea of patriarchy suggests that feminists should recognize the current wave of male grievance as an opportunity to renegotiate the entire social compact of gender that has been built up over centuries of male power. 



  • Alito's Opinion Shows Roe is Only the Beginning

    by Thomas Zimmer

    The entire idea of substantive due process under the 14th Amendment is called into question by the draft opinion, potentially threatening reproductive rights, civil rights, and sexual freedom in service of a reactionary ideal of patriarchal society. 



  • "Father Knows Best": Anti-LGBTQ Legislation and the Patriarchy

    by Judith Levine

    The elision of children’s interests and parents’ rights is not just bad grammar, however. It is an expression of conservative “pro-family” ideology, which posits the family as an indivisible unit where everyone’s interests are unanimous.



  • Revenge of the Patriarchs: Why Autocrats Fear Women

    by Erica Chenoweth and Zoe Marks

    "Fully free, politically active women are a threat to authoritarian and authoritarian-leaning leaders—and so those leaders have a strategic reason to be sexist."



  • Daddy Issues

    by Bethany Moreton

    White American Christians have embraced aggressive patriarchy as access to social and economic power has become more concentrated in fewer hands. 



  • Richard Nixon Bears Responsibility for the Pandemic’s Child-Care Crisis

    by Anna K. Danziger Halperin

    Today’s child-care crisis may have been fueled by the outbreak, but it is not new. It has been simmering below the surface for decades and can be traced back to President Richard M. Nixon’s 1971 veto of federally funded universal child care.

  • The Modesty Wars: Women and the Hasidim in Brooklyn

    by Ruth Rosen

    Via Flickr.Originally posted on openDemocracy.Until recently, you could have lived your entire life in the United States and never have bumped into any Jewish Orthodox Hasidim, who live in scattered communities, mostly in the New York’s borough of Brooklyn. In the last few years, however, the media have publicized the Hasidim’s cultural clashes with their non-fundamentalist neighbours. In each instance, the conflict has pitted the Hasidic view of women’s modest traditional dress and their appropriate role in the family, on the streets, and in their community against the sexualized dress and behaviour of their neighbours.