;

Chinese history



  • Event: June Fourth: The Tiananmen Protests and Beijing Massacre of 1989 (June 1, 2021)

    Jeremy Brown’s June Fourth takes a historical approach to the events of 1989 in China, arguing that the Beijing massacre was neither necessary nor inevitable, and tracing alternative paths that could have led to different outcomes. He addresses the National History Center's Washington History Seminar on June 1. 



  • It’s a Golden Age for Chinese Archaeology — And the West is Ignoring It

    by Rowan K. Flad

    Recent discoveries in Egypt have overshadowed more significant finds in China. This may reflect the romanticized popular culture image of colonial-era tomb-raiders, or the prevalent sense that Western civilization is derived from the Mediterranean world. It's time for a broader view of why the ancient world matters. 



  • The World’s Most Important Body of Water

    by Daniel Yergin

    The author of a book on the dispute over control of the South China sea examines four critical decisionmakers whose actions shaped the present conflict. 



  • The real danger of coronavirus

    by Jessica Hauger

    Chinese and Chinese American people have served as scapegoats for infectious disease outbreaks and sanitation failures in the United States and around the world to particularly alarming effect.



  • May Fourth, the Day That Changed China

    by Jeffrey N. Wasserstrom

    Protests in 1919 propelled the country toward modernity. One hundred years later, the warlord spirit is back in Beijing.