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censorship



  • Has BYU Canceled a Leading Historian of Mormonism?

    The Neal A. Maxwell Institute appears to be disavowing its previous connections to historian Benjamin Park. Is it because of his objections to some LDS leaders' positions on LGBTQ issues and masking and vaccination in response to COVID? 



  • EBay Deletes the Queer Past

    The online auction company's decision may make it difficult for historians of LGBTQ cultures and of sexuality to build archives of historically signicant erotica. 



  • Before the Anti-CRT Activists, there were White Citizens’ Councils

    by David A. Love

    "Employing the techniques of the White Citizens’ Council, a 21st-century White resistance movement threatens to turn back the clock on civil rights and racial justice and create a new future built on erasing the past."



  • Today It’s Critical Race Theory. 200 Years Ago It Was Abolitionist Literature

    In 1829, South Carolina and Georgia responded to a series of fires they assumed were set by enslaved people by banning both the abolitionist literature they blamed for inciting rebellion and the teaching of literacy to slaves. Today's battles over curriculum are likewise about ideas deemed threatening to social hierarchies.



  • Hitler’s ‘Mein Kampf’ Gets New French Edition, With Each Lie Annotated

    The publishers, who will donate proceeds to the Auschwitz-Birkenau Foundation, argue that with other versions of Hitler's manifesto circulating widely, a translation that preserves the incoherence and paranoia of the original with extensive debunking commentary is a positive contribution to efforts to fight the far right. 


  • The Same Mistakes Twice? Teaching Dr. Seuss

    by Walter Kamphoefner

    Step back from the current media controversy and consider how Theodor Geisel's cartooning illustrate the contradictory nature of America's posture toward foreign and domestic racism in the World War II era, a pivotal moment for the nation that must be understood in all its complication. 



  • Atomic Cover-Up

    by Greg Mitchell

    Greg Mitchell's Atomic Cover-Up premiers this month and tells the story of two film crews, one Japanese and one from the U.S. Army, whose footage of the human toll of the Hiroshima and Nagasaki bombings was seized and suppressed by the U.S. goverment. 


  • FDR and the Need for Truth

    by Stephen Dando-Collins

    Franklin Roosevelt took a novel approach to handling bad domestic and military news in 1943, amid stiff political opposition: showing the public the hard truth about the Pacific War.