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terrorism


  • 9/11's Memorials and the Politics of Historical Memory

    by Marita Sturken

    Major 9/11 memorials try to fix the public memory on a moment of national unity that, 20 years later, seems illusory. Other memorials point the way to using the force of memory to encourage critical reflection on nationalism.


  • Were the 9/11 Attacks Preventable?

    by J. Samuel Walker

    It's impossible to know if more diligent preparation for potential Al Qaeda attacks could have prevented them, but the Bush administration's slowness to develop a national security strategy for terrorism will always haunt the nation and the world. 



  • Perspective on the History of the Taliban

    Wazmah Osman of Temple University discusses how the weekend's events, when the fall of Kabul seemed imminent, and explains why the Taliban's defeat was illusory.


  • White Terrorism: From Post-Civil-War Lynchings to the Present

    by Walter G. Moss

    The Capitol riots of January 6 echoed elements of mob lynchings in the participants' binary us/them view of society, a conservative white Protestant religious culture, and a willingness to accept rumor and conspiracy as justifications for their actions.



  • America’s Political Roots Are in Eutaw, Alabama

    "The terror campaign of 1870 ended the promise of Alabama’s brief Reconstruction era, allowing the so-called Redeemers to pry Alabama from the hands of reform. This was the critical juncture that led to the way things are."



  • Will Insurrection Lead to Terrorism?

    by Martha Crenshaw

    An expert on terrorism and political violence looks to other examples of insurrection to ask what the hardcore extremists at the center of the Capitol riots are likely to do next. Such groups and the recruits they gained on January 6 are likely to become more isolated, but more extreme, and have access to guns unlike any other extremists in the world.



  • An American Pogrom (Review)

    by David W. Blight

    David W. Blight reviews a new book on the 1898 Wilmington massacre and the violent overthrow of multiracial democracy in North Carolina. 



  • Terror and Technology, From Dynamite to Drones (Review)

    Audrey Cronin's new book warns that terrorist networks are less likely to employ cutting-edge technology than to adapt widely-available tools to new destructive ends; security experts are still surprised by this repeating pattern. 



  • Policing the World (Review)

    by Andrew Lanham

    Since World War II, the United States has spread its style of policing—and police technology—around the world as a way to exert control. This link between modern policing and the national security state means they will have to be democratized together.