;

media



  • Musk's Twitter Bid Harkens Back to Hearst

    Richard White and Brad DeLong consider how the megabillionaire's bid for Twitter stacks up against other efforts by the ultra-rich to build media empires – is it more about attention and less about advancing financial interests? 



  • Tucker Carlson Heralds Yet Another "Crisis of Masculinity"

    by Mona Charen

    Tucker Carlson's recent examination of testicular tanning as a boost to manliness shows the need for societies to support pathways to male expression that don't lead to violence or painful sunburns. 



  • Why is the News Media so Hawkish?

    by Mark Hannah

    Editorial choices made by influential news organizations can push policy in the direction of more aggressive intervention. A media scholar asks why those organizations have consistently chosen to boost the voices of advocates for war.


  • A New Kind of Memory for a New Kind of War?

    by Shannon Bontrager

    "The terrain of combat has changed, digital images are just as important as ammunition and digital platforms are just as important as factories and military hardware."



  • War as a Spectator Event

    by Nicole Hemmer

    It's necessary to consider the ethics and morality of consuming warfare as a spectator event, and to temper emotional reactions spurred by images of suffering with understanding of their context. 



  • What Happened When I Went on Joe Rogan's Podcast

    by Jonathan Zimmerman

    There are many reasons to lament the misinformation spread by Joe Rogan, but shunning him won't help him use his massive platform more wisely. 



  • Reviewed: The BBC: A People's History

    David Hendy's book was built on complete access to BBC archives, but a reviewer finds that it's long on bureaucratic history and short on analysis of the programming that made the Beeb a national institution. 



  • Trump's NPR Interview Shows the Hazard of Giving Him Airtime

    by Federico Finchelstein

    The history of fascism shows that it's a mistake for the news media to treat propagandists as honest actors. They'll exploit the free press to promote their ideas, but crush independent journalism at the first opportunity.


  • Journalism is Under Siege in Hong Kong

    by Luwei Rose Luqiu

    The Hong Kong government's increasingly confrontational response to critical journalism is a troubling indicator of a willingness to engage in authoritarian restrictions of the press in the name of national security. 



  • The Media Needs to Acknowledge the African American History in Barbecue

    by Adrian Miller

    As industry has reduced the labor intensity of barbecue and the media has made culinary celebrities, contemporary white chefs have supplanted the African American pitmasters who were once considered indispensable to the art.



  • How Tucker Carlson Became the Voice of White Grievance

    "What emerges is a portrait of an ambitious television personality who came of age in privilege — having grown up in an upper-class enclave and attended private schools — but who, by his own telling, is a victim."