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Latino/a history


  • The Issue of Visibility in Latino Art

    by Ricardo Romo

    "The moment is ripe for bringing Latino art to public spaces and public museums. The number of talented Latino artists has multiplied over the past two decades, and the opportunity to make their work visible is now."



  • 2022's Labor Uprising Reminds of More Radical Past and Possible Future

    by Xochitl Gonzalez

    The Puerto Rican Revolutionary Workers' Organization encouraged its college-educated members to take on industrial work to support a labor union movement in crisis; the moment encouraged a broader sense of who is a worker. Today, are workers in health, service, and logistics coming to a similar recognition? 



  • Planning For The People Y Qué? From Advocacy Planners To Hardcore Punks

    by Mike Amezcua

    "Punk fliers are planning documents. Not the official kind produced by city planning departments, of course, nor the grassroots plans by neighborhood activists resisting investment capital and gentrification. But these fliers contain a planning schema all the same."



  • The DC Punk Scene Relied on the Local Latinx Community

    by Mike Amezcua

    "A big piece is missing from the stories told about punk and hardcore in the 1980s: Primarily, that marginalized spaces and communities in urban America gave a stage to the predominantly white subculture."



  • Bouie: Language is Not the Democrats' Problem

    Historian Gerardo Cadava's research on Hispanic Republicans suggests that there is an enduring affinity for the conservative themes of work and initiative among Latino voters; addressing the desire for upward mobility in concrete ways, not tweaking their language, is the most urgent task facing Democrats. 


  • The Fantasy of Hispanic Heritage Month

    by Frank P. Barajas

    Conceived by a Congressman to honor the contributions of ethnic Mexicans to American society, Hispanic Heritage Month is based in a mythical Spanish past that obscures the indigenous history of the west and legitimates the succession of power from Iberian to Anglo elites. 



  • Why Democrats are Losing Texas Latinos

    A significant portion of Tejanos consider themselves white and many vote like Anglo Texans; their history shows the contingency of racial categories and the risk for Democrats of assuming demographics will substitute for political appeal. 



  • Review: Geraldo Cadava's "The Hispanic Republican"

    by Jerry González

    Historian Jerry González says that "The Hispanic Republican is a wake-up call for progressives, particularly white liberals, who uncritically believe that rising Latinx population numbers will naturally shift the political winds."