;

Latino/a history


  • Latino Activists Changed San Antonio in the 1960s

    by Ricardo Romo

    San Antonio in the 1960s faced many of the same challenges of cities throughout the South; its emerging Mexican American political leadership helped steer the city in a progressive direction. 



  • Miami-Dade has Lurched Right, but Still Loves "Obamacare"

    by Catherine Mas

    Even though conservative Latinos in Miami are generally suspicious of "socialism", the long history of local government support for medical access means that many carve out a big exception for the Affordable Care Act. 



  • The History of Mexican Americans in Austin

    by Cynthia E. Orozco

    A historian works to develop a chronicle of Mexican American community events in the city of Austin with a local community newspaper. 


  • The Wartime Service and Postwar Activism of One Latino Veteran

    by Ricardo Romo

    For Veteran's Day, a historian shares photos, and the history, of his father's wartime experiences. Like many of his compatriots, Henry Romo was reluctant to discuss those experiences, but drew on them to work for equal citizenship at home. 



  • Can Americans Understand the Divisions in Latino Politics?

    by Geraldo Cadava

    Despite the lip service both parties pay to welcoming (and deserving) the growing Latino vote, do their non-Latino leaders actually understand the complexities of this large demographic category? Do they want to? 



  • Black-Brown Solidarity has been Elusive in Los Angeles

    by Erin Aubry Kaplan

    For decades, the increasing Latino presence in previously Black neighborhoods in South Los Angeles has raised concerns about political representation and hopes for a cross-racial movement for a more just city. Recent leaked city councl tapes show things are far from settled. 



  • My Students are Missing Their Own History

    by Arlene Dávila

    Disagreement over the particular labels used to describe Latino/a (or Latinx) people shouldn't overshadow the need for a more inclusive history. 



  • At its 50th Reunion, La Raza Unida Asks How to Pass the Torch

    La Raza Unida grew out of civil rights mobilization in the 1960s and worked to mobilize the large, complex, and internally divided communities of ethnic Mexican Texans, focusing on education and voting rights, and struggling to bridge radical and moderate political outlooks. 


  • Gil Coronado: The Padrino of National Hispanic Month

    by Ricardo Romo

    After dropping out of high school to begin his Air Force career at age 15, Gil Coronado became the most influential leader in expanding the federal recognition of Hispanic heritage from a week to a month. 


  • The Chicano Moratorium in East LA and Ventura County

    by Frank P. Barajas

    Chicano Moratorium commemorations continue today in communities in and out of East Los Angeles as they mark a history that centers on the experience of ethnic Mexican and Latinx peoples in the US to inspire and reinspire the young and old, to continue their struggle to realize the ideal of justice for all.