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education history

  • Will Black Students Return to Schools After COVID?

    by Adam Laats

    There is reason to believe that the COVID crisis will push many Black parents to conclude that their local public schools are failing their children and to seek alternatives. In the past, similar movements have pointed the way to new models of education. 



  • What Is Critical Race Theory And Why Did Oklahoma Just Ban It?

    by Kathryn Schumaker

    Attacks on "critical race theory" in Oklahoma's legislature are part of a political effort to prevent discussion of the state's racist past – the legislature made CRT a culture war issue as the centennial of the Tulsa Race Massacre approaches. Here's why we need more, not less, of the ideas behind CRT.



  • Discovery Of Schoolhouse For Black Children Now Offers A History Lesson

    The discovery of an 18th century schoolhouse on the campus of William & Mary offers a chance for public historians to explain the complexity of Black education in colonial Virginia, which taught reading in the hopes of indoctrinating both free and enslaved children with pro-slavery ideology.



  • University Finds 18th-Century Schoolhouse Where Black Children Learned to Read

    The discovery of a 260-year-old structure with such a deep connection to a little-known chapter of the history of Colonial Williamsburg, when the population was more than 50 percent Black and teaching slaves to read was legal, is especially significant, said history professor Jody Lynn Allen. 



  • A History of Technological Hype

    by Victoria E.M. Cain and Adam Laats

    The history of education shows a series of episodes of hasty, ill-considered investment in hyped technologies that failed spectacularly. Will that history convince administrators to look (and research) before they take the next leap?



  • The Contours of Black Studies in American Public Schools

    by Alexander Hyres

    A historian of education argues that Black studies was not an invention of the 1960s; its flawed implementation reflected the long battles Black activists fought against hostile and indifferent school administrations for decades before.