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Police



  • The Shocking MOVE Bombing was Part of a Broader Pattern of Anti-Black Racism

    by J.T. Roane

    The Philadelphia Police Department bears responsibility for the deadly bombing of the rowhouse occupied by MOVE members, but the carnage shows a long pattern of indifference by multiple municipal departments to the health, safety, and quality of life of Black residents in the 1970s and 1980s. 



  • Elizabeth Hinton: Unearthing the Roots of Black Rebellion

    Elizabeth Hinton's new book argues that anti-police uprisings, commonly called "riots," were frequent and widespread in American Black communities in the 1960s, and should be understood as a political movement against inequality and the inherently abusive nature of the "war on crime." 



  • Police and the License to Kill

    by Matthew D. Lassiter

    The history of the Detroit Police Department shows that police reforms won't reduce killing as long as departments can set priorities that result in racially targeted and discretionary enforcement and are allowed to investigate and sanction the conduct of their own officers. 



  • The Long Brutality

    by Keisha N. Blain

    Two police killings highlight the specifically gendered nature of state violence against Black people, and the particular ways Black women are targeted. In this respect, the history of Black Lives Matter is a long history of Black women's political activism.



  • Princeton Owes the Families of the MOVE Bombing Victims Answers

    by Judith Weisenfeld, Ruha Benjamin et al.

    Members of the Princeton faculty argue that "the victims of the MOVE bombing, their families, and those of us at Princeton invested in Black history and communities deserve more" than the university's statements to date about the use of remains of the victims. 



  • The MOVE Bombing and the Callous Handling of Black Remains

    by Jessica Parr

    The remains of the victims of the Philadelphia Police Department's bombing of the MOVE organization in 1985, including two children, were acquired by the University of Pennsylvania, stored outside of climate control, passed on to Princeton, and eventually lost, a final indignity to the victims. 



  • From Rodney King to George Floyd: Reliving the Scars of Police Violence

    "The murder trial of Derek Chauvin is at the center of a national reckoning on race and policing. But cycles of protests over systemic racism and policing are not new. We watched the trial with the families of Rodney King, Oscar Grant and Stephon Clark to see this moment in history through their eyes."



  • Compliance Will Not Save Me

    by Ibram X. Kendi

    The idea that Black people can preserve their lives through absolute compliance with police is a vestige of the age of slavery and Jim Crow, but history shows that compliance has never secured safety under white supremacy. 



  • The County Where Cops Call the Shots

    Aaron Bekemeyer's PhD dissertation research examines how police unions, like those in Suffolk County, NY, became powerful in the 20th Century. Jennifer Mittelstadt also comments on the exceptional status of police unions.


  • Policing, Protest, and the Role of the University

    by David S. Busch

    Student activists at Northwestern, in other words, are asking a similar question that emerged out of the 1960s and famous protest moments at Jackson State and Kent State in 1970: What should be the university’s public purpose?


  • Incognegro, Part II: How New York Law Enforcement Worked to Destroy Core

    by L.E.J. Rachell

    Ray Wood's memoir alleges that as a rookie NYPD detective he was coerced to act as an agent provocateur to convince members of New York's Congress of Racial Equality (CORE) chapters to commit crimes or other acts that would discredit and destroy the movement. The NYPD and FBI could clear the air by releasing their files on infiltration of Black-led organizations.