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capitalism



  • After 20 Years, Enron Still Haunts Us

    by Gavin Benke

    Despite Enron's bankruptcy and the resulting economic fallout, American business media is still dangerously credulous toward promises of "innovation" and "disruption" without asking whether the latest hot entrepreneur is using smoke and mirrors. 



  • Lizabeth Cohen: Why Americans Buy So Much Stuff

    As holiday shopping overlaps with historic supply chain disruptions, NPR's Mary Louise Kelly talks with Lizabeth Cohen on the economy's reliance on spending and the culture of consumerism in the U.S.



  • The Not-So-Hidden Purpose of the University of Austin

    by Daniel Drezner

    Anyone attracted to the promises of academic freedom and untrammeled inquiry at the University of Austin should be scared of the power it proposes to concentrate in its corporate governing board. 



  • How Historians Helped Convince Big Business Trump Was Dangerous

    Historian Timothy Snyder recounts his role in a November 2020 presentation to business leaders about the authoritarian danger reflected in Trump's lies about the "stolen" election. Did a potential coup fail because CEOs thought it was bad for business? Or is there a change afoot in corporate citizenship?


  • Why Does Speculation Persist in the Age of Predictive Data?

    by Gayle Rogers

    "During this pandemic, all of us have studied many data points to assess our risks and predict how safe our futures will be under X or Y scenarios. Even when there has been no shortage of data, even when the data have overwhelmed us, the future has never been made certain and clear for us by them. Instead, we have had to become speculators to some degree."



  • Our Insurance Dystopia

    by Caley Horan

    America's health insurance morass is a result of the replacement of the ideal of mutual, universal risk sharing with the privatization of risk in pursuit of profit. 



  • The World the Suez Canal Made

    by Aaron Jakes

    "The purpose of the Suez Canal, from the perspective of both the Egyptian state and its European investors, was not simply to render the world more interconnected and international transport more efficient, but to extract transit fees from the ships passing through it."



  • The Biggest Lesson of GameStop

    The GameStop episode highlights a dangerous development in the last 40 years of capitalism's history: the linking of broad-based purchasing power to the fluctuating prices of financial assets held in retirement accounts. 



  • The End of the Businessman President

    by Kyle Edward Williams

    Will Donald Trump's response to the coronavirus pandemic mark the end of the pernicious myths that the popular good is served by running government like a business, or that business executives have a talent for governing? 



  • The Prosperity Hoax

    A 2020 report on global poverty suggests that the problem is getting worse, directly attacking the methodologies the World Bank has used for decades to justify global capitalism as an anti-poverty program. 



  • Eric Williams’ Foundational Work on Slavery, Industry, and Wealth

    by Katie Donington

    Debates over Eric Williams’s work have ebbed and flowed ever since he first published Capitalism and Slavery in 1944. His book inspired a body of historiography to which many historians of slavery and abolition have added their voices over the decades.



  • Neoliberal Hong Kong Is Our Future, Too

    by Macabe Keliher

    While orthodox economists like to point to Hong Kong as an ideal free market, the social consequences have been disastrous. Inequality is rising, wages are declining and working hours increasing, overall economic opportunity is dwindling, and housing is so unaffordable that office workers sleep in McDonalds. Is it any wonder that the streets are now burning?