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Protest



  • The Fatal Siloing of Abortion Advocacy

    by Meaghan Winter

    It was a strategic mistake for abortion rights advocates to emphasize the right to individual choice instead of the vast issues of economic justice, workforce quality, educational equity and personal safety that are impacted by whether women can control their own reproduction. 



  • A Bizarre War on Protest By Republican Judges

    "If protest leaders can be hauled into court — and potentially forced to pay out of their own pockets — for the actions of a single protest attendee, then no sensible person will organize a protest."



  • The History of Tying Up Traffic for Protest

    by David Greenberg

    More militant leaders in the Black freedom movement advocated obstructing traffic on a large scale as an expanded form of nonviolent direct action; the tensions these plans provoked in the movement show that there are seldom clear principles for which movement tactics are legitimate, outside of our opinions of their goals. 



  • When Eartha Kitt Disrupted the Ladies Who Lunch

    In 1968, real life imitated "Batman" as the Catwoman actress broke the veneer of politeness at a luncheon hosted by Lady Bird Johnson to denounce the war against Vietnam. But while Catwoman always got away, Kitt's career was destroyed for a decade.



  • The Paranoid Style Comes to Canadian Politics

    by Eric Merkley

    Canadian politics, until recently, seemed free of the kind of extreme sorting taking place in other democracies, where partisan affiliation, cultural values, and religious or ethnic identity all align closely. The Ottawa protests show cracks in the nation's liberal order that the far right is trying to exploit, says a political scientist.



  • The Return of the Mass Protest

    by Elizabeth Hinton

    Although mass protests are far more peaceful than they were in the 1960s, reviving nonviolent direct action tactics associated with MLK, the police response to them has been more heavily armed and violent.



  • Direct Action: The Practical Politics of Protest

    by Erin Pineda

    "Protesters may be a loud minority of citizens, a set of especially motivated and impassioned individuals who are in many ways not representative of the general public. But the silent majority of voters are not as disconnected from—or dismissive of—protest as many assume."



  • Law Enforcement Has Long Practiced Double Standards for Activists

    by Denise Lynn

    Nobody should be shocked that the FBI has aggressively surveilled Black Lives Matter organizers while deciding that the online organizing of the January 6 attack on the Capitol was protected speech; this double standard has characterized law enforcement's approach to racial justice protest. 


  • The View from the New York City Hiroshima Peace Vigil

    by Michael McQuillan

    The march featured the testimony of antinuclear activists and rekindled a demand for New York's city council to divest the city budget from contractors who make nuclear weapons, but too much of the public seems willing to ignore the nuclear threat.