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publishing


  • Are Campus Bookstores Undermining Student Learning?

    by Elizabeth Stice

    Today’s undergraduates are increasingly being cornered into ongoing financial commitments for everything, while they never take possession of anything. Rejecting digital book programs run by campus bookstores outsourced to third parties could help reverse this trend.



  • On Popular History: Rebecca Traister

    by Alexis Coe

    Historian Alexis Coe interviews writer and essayist Rebecca Traister on the historical research informing her work and the links between popular and academic audiences for historical knowledge. 



  • Billion-Dollar Book Companies Are Ripping Off Public Schools

    Although they tout the advantages of learning technology, major publishers exploit copyright law and licensing agreements to force school districts to pay $27 per student per year for temporary access to digital copies of books like "The Diary of Anne Frank." 



  • 50 Years On, the Feminist Press Is Radical and Relevant

    A look back at the ongoing work of the Feminist Press and the legacy of founder Florence Howe, who saved the work of many women authors from obscurity and helped support the emerging study of literature by women. 



  • Celebrating 50 Years of Essence as a Black Women’s Archive

    by Jacinta R. Saffold

    "For the last 50 years, Essence Magazine has consistently found innovative approaches to archiving Black women’s lives by immortalizing our intellect, literature, and culture on glossy pages," writes Jacinta R. Saffold.


  • American Heritage to Subscribers: Sorry, No Refunds

    by David Austin Walsh

    American Heritage magazine, the embattled quarterly history periodical that suspended print publication in the fall of 2012, is not currently issuing refunds to its 120,000 subscribers, a spokesperson has told HNN.“We're currently restructuring the organization, trying to balance between the non-profit and publishing entities,” said Lee Sutton, online and editorial associate for the magazine. Mr. Sutton said he was not sure about the company's future plans for either refunding subscribers or resumption of publication of the magazine.Mr. Sutton referred our inquiry to the vice president of administration, who did not respond to HNN as of press time.Subscribers are not happy. “I paid for a two-year subscription and received two issues,” wrote one commentator. “No response from AH to my emails. Just hoping someone will take them to court to get our refunds. I used to have respect for AH magazine and its owners.”