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Displaying 25891-25896 of 25896 results.
ID: 154062
Uid: 4699
Author: 4
Category: 0
Title: The Man Who Named the Super Bowl After His Kid’s Toy
Source: The Daily Beast
Body: <p style="line-height: 29.5px; margin: 0px 0px 15px; font-size: 17px; color: rgb(2, 20, 31); font-family: Georgia, Cambria, &quot;Times New Roman&quot;, Times, serif;">Lamar Hunt, America’s super duper Sixties’ serial sports franchiser and league founder, used his daddy’s oil fortune to launch the American Football League, World Championship Tennis, the North American Soccer League, the Kansas City Chiefs, and the Chicago Bulls, while naming football’s do-or-die World Series after his kids’ incredibly-bouncy Superball.</p><p style="line-height: 29.5px; margin: 0px 0px 15px; font-size: 17px; color: rgb(2, 20, 31); font-family: Georgia, Cambria, &quot;Times New Roman&quot;, Times, serif;">In winning their record-breaking tenth American Football Conference Championship Game this January, the New England Patriots won yet another Lamar Hunt Trophy. Sadly, few remember Hunt – or hail him for America’s football obsession, and for the estimated 4.9 billion potato chips, 1.3 billion chicken wings, and 1.2 billion beer bottles we will consume on Super Bowl Sunday.&nbsp;</p><p style="line-height: 29.5px; margin: 0px 0px 15px; font-size: 17px; color: rgb(2, 20, 31); font-family: Georgia, Cambria, &quot;Times New Roman&quot;, Times, serif;">Born in 1932, Lamar was the tenth child of&nbsp;<a class="LinkWrapper LinkWrapper--external" href="https://tshaonline.org/handbook/online/articles/fhu59" style="color: inherit; transition: color 0.15s ease;">Haroldson Lafayette Hunt</a>&nbsp;(1889-1974), the Illinois-born Arkansas gambler who used his poker winnings to buy the East Texas Oil Fields, and become a super-rich, cartoonish Texas tycoon. Living in a super-sized Mount Vernon knockoff, H.L. Hunt fathered fifteen children with three overlapping wives. His roguish hypocrisy fed rumors that he inspired the J.R. Ewing character on TV’s&nbsp;Dallas¸ while his kooky conservatism fed darker whisperings that he bankrolled President John F. Kennedy’s assassination in Dallas...</p><p style="line-height: 29.5px; margin: 0px 0px 15px; font-size: 17px; color: rgb(2, 20, 31); font-family: Georgia, Cambria, &quot;Times New Roman&quot;, Times, serif;"><a href="https://www.thedailybeast.com/the-man-who-named-the-super-bowl-after-his-kids-toy?ref=author">Read whole article on The Daily Beast.</a></p>
ID: 154063
Uid: 4699
Author: 4
Category: 0
Title: Is Harriet Jacobs The Black Anne Frank?
Source: The Daily Beast
Body: <p style="line-height: 29.5px; margin: 0px 0px 15px; font-size: 17px; color: rgb(2, 20, 31); font-family: Georgia, Cambria, &quot;Times New Roman&quot;, Times, serif;">Is&nbsp;<a class="LinkWrapper LinkWrapper--external" href="https://www.dallasnews.com/news/news/2016/06/17/harriet-jacobs-a-slavery-tale-with-echoes-of-anne-frank" style="color: inherit; transition: color 0.15s ease;">calling</a>&nbsp;Harriet Ann Jacobs, a teenage runaway slave who hid in a crawl space for nearly seven years, a black “<a class="LinkWrapper LinkWrapper--external" href="http://www.nytimes.com/2004/07/11/books/to-be-a-slave.html" style="color: inherit; transition: color 0.15s ease;">Anne Frank</a>,” helpful or disrespectful?</p><p style="line-height: 29.5px; margin: 0px 0px 15px; font-size: 17px; color: rgb(2, 20, 31); font-family: Georgia, Cambria, &quot;Times New Roman&quot;, Times, serif;">The answer is “yes, both.” &nbsp;Analogies are like medicines—most have side effects. Historians like using the familiar to access the unfamiliar, yet dislike reducing complex events to one dimension that resonates—and risks implying that fame always predominates.&nbsp;</p><p style="line-height: 29.5px; margin: 0px 0px 15px; font-size: 17px; color: rgb(2, 20, 31); font-family: Georgia, Cambria, &quot;Times New Roman&quot;, Times, serif;">Anne Frank died seven months after the Nazis raided the “Secret Annex” where she hid for two years. &nbsp;She was fifteen. Harriet Jacobs escaped her oppressors and lived until 84. She became, er, a black Harriet Beecher Stowe, and a female Frederick Douglass. Her searing memoir<a class="LinkWrapper LinkWrapper--external" href="https://www.amazon.com/Incidents-Life-Slave-Chump-Change/dp/164032030X" style="color: inherit; transition: color 0.15s ease;">&nbsp;Incidents in the Life of a Slave Girl</a>&nbsp;defied America’s proprieties to expose what happened when men treated women as property...</p><p style="line-height: 29.5px; margin: 0px 0px 15px; font-size: 17px; color: rgb(2, 20, 31); font-family: Georgia, Cambria, &quot;Times New Roman&quot;, Times, serif;"><a href="https://www.thedailybeast.com/is-harriet-jacobs-the-black-anne-frank?ref=author">Read whole article on The Daily Beast.</a></p>
ID: 154064
Uid: 78568
Author: 36
Category: 0
Title: What You Don't Know About Abolitionism: An Interview with Manisha Sinha on Her Groundbreaking Study
Source:
Body: Click <a href="http://historynewsnetwork.org/article/168091">here</a> for the interview.
ID: 154065
Uid: 78565
Author: 38
Category: 0
Title: Americans Have Again Ranked JFK Among the 3 Best Modern Presidents
Source:
Body: <p></p><p style="text-align: center;"><img src="/sites/default/files/154065-JFK_and_family_in_Hyannis_Port,_04_August_1962.jpg "></p><p><i><br></i></p><p><b>Related Link </b><a href="http://historynewsnetwork.org/article/21954">HNN Hot Topic: &nbsp;President's Day</a></p><p> <i>Rick Shenkman is the publisher of the History News Network and the author of <a href="http://stoneagebrain.com">Political Animals:&nbsp; How Our Stone-Age Brain Gets in the Way of Smart Politics </a>(Basic Books, January 2016), from which this article is adapted. You can <a href="https://twitter.com/rickshenkman">follow</a> him on Twitter. He blogs at <a href="http://historynewsnetwork.org/blog/author/38">stoneagebrain.</a></i> </p><p>Let’s try a thought experiment. Think for a moment about John F. Kennedy. What comes to mind, excluding the assassination, which obviously is memorable, and the stories of his adultery, which I just mentioned, and which are therefore easily called up from memory? I will guess that it is an image of some kind: Kennedy on his sailboat, his hair flying in the wind. Or&nbsp;Kennedy playing touch football on the lawn of the family estate in Hyannis Port. Or Jack and Jackie out for a stroll. Or Kennedy (hatless) delivering his inaugural address: “Ask not what your country can do for you. . . .” Or, my favorite, a tanned Kennedy wearing his Ray-Bans and an Izod Lacoste open-collar shirt.</p> <p><a href="https://www.amazon.com/Political-Animals-Stone-Age-Brain-Politics/dp/0465033008/ref=asap_bc?ie=UTF8 "><img src="/sites/default/files/160130-PA-shenkman-sm.png" "="" style="float:left;margin:15px;"></a> Why is it important what images come to mind? I think it helps us understand something that is almost incomprehensible. When Americans are asked—today—to name the greatest presidents of the United States, they routinely mention Kennedy among the top three. This is difficult to understand. Any fair estimate of his legacy is that it was modest. The only major legislation he got passed was a tax cut lowering the top rate from 90 percent to 70 percent. His foreign policy record included one out-and-out disaster (the Bay of Pigs invasion of Cuba, which had to be abandoned); one near-disaster (the Cuban Missile Crisis, which he successfully defused but inadvertently triggered, partly as a result of a &nbsp;flawed performance at a summit months earlier with the Soviet leader, who concluded that Kennedy could be bullied); and a disaster-in-waiting (Vietnam, to which Kennedy sent 16,000 “advisers”). The civil rights laws, with which he is closely associated, were actually passed by Lyndon Johnson. </p><p style="text-align: center;"><a href="http://www.centerforpolitics.org/crystalball/articles/public-rates-presidents-jfk-reagan-obama-at-top-nixon-lbj-trump-at-bottom/"><img src=" /sites/default/files/154065-chart.png"></a></p><p style="text-align: center;"><span style="font-size: smaller;">Larry Sabato survey 2018</span></p> <p>So what can account for Kennedy’s enduring popularity more than fifty years after his death? Historians tell us it’s owing to many factors, which they cited in the numerous studies and articles that appeared in 2013, on the fiftieth anniversary of his assassination. These include, they said, his charisma, his soaring rhetoric, his support for the civil rights movement (which Democrats like), his advocacy of tax cuts (which Republicans like), his identification with the prosperous 1960s economy, his peace speech at American University in 1963, his commitment to inspiring national projects, including the moon landing and the Peace Corps, and, of course, sadness at his gruesome assassination.&nbsp;</p><p>A poll commissioned by the political scientist Larry Sabato, the author of one of the anniversary assassination books, found that older Americans who have living memories of Kennedy rank him a little higher than those who don’t, which suggests that his presidential record, hazy as it may be, is probably affecting the way these older Americans think about Kennedy. But both young and old Americans hold roughly the same views. Asked to state which American president they’d want living in the White House today, Kennedy was the pick in 2013 of 16 percent of those over 54 and 11 percent of those 54 and under. A 2018 survey found that JFK was ranked the best of all modern presidents. (See chart above.)</p> <p>But could the historians be making this more complicated than it actually is? Is how we think about Kennedy really influenced by a deep knowledge of his achievements? Recall what came to mind in our thought&nbsp;experiment a moment ago. It wasn’t Kennedy’s achievements, it was those regnant images. This suggests that Kennedy is remembered by ordinary Americans as a great president because the pictures of him in our head are compelling and positive and mythical. It’s not his accomplishments that matter so much—most people, after all, don’t know much of anything about his record—but all those images.&nbsp;</p><p>John F. Kennedy looked convincing as a leader. That’s why he became Hollywood’s idea of a president. Presidents in the movies don’t look like Dwight D. Eisenhower (though historians rank him a better president), they look like John Kennedy. The man and the myth come together in pictures. And the pictures in our head come easily to mind because the pictures are readily available to us. We don’t have to struggle to call up flattering images of Kennedy. The human brain allows us to call them to mind quickly because our brain readily digests information in the form of images. Around 50 percent of our brain is devoted to visual tasks. Pictures are readily recalled. This leads us to trust them as a source of good information.</p> <p>What all this suggests is that Kennedy cannot be considered apart from his images. They are a powerful part of his legacy. Indeed, it is hard to imagine that Kennedy would be lionized by young people today but for these images. Vision is that critical. And that's a bit frightening.&nbsp;</p>
ID: 154066
Uid: 31615
Author: 19
Category: 0
Title: President Trump Versus Trump Voters
Source:
Body: <p class="MsoNormal"><span style="font-size:12.0pt">Donald Trump became President because millions of Americans believed him when he promised to protect their financial health. Social Security, Medicare and Medicaid keep the budgets of most Americans, especially the elderly, above water. Trump promised over and over again not to cut them.</span></p> <p class="MsoNormal"><span style="font-size:12.0pt">&nbsp;</span></p> <p class="MsoNormal"><span style="font-size:12.0pt">He did this loud and clear, as a way of differentiating himself from other Republicans. Even before he officially announced his candidacy, he told the conservative “Daily Signal” in <a href="http://dailysignal.com/2015/05/21/why-donald-trump-wont-touch-your-entitlements/?utm_source=twitterfeed&amp;utm_medium=twitter">May 2015</a>: “I’m not going to cut Social Security like every other Republican and I’m not going to cut Medicare or Medicaid. Every other Republican is going to cut, and even if they wouldn’t, they don’t know what to do because they don’t know where the money is. I do.” His <a href="http://time.com/3923128/donald-trump-announcement-speech/">announcement</a> that he was a candidate the next month included “Save Medicare, Medicaid and Social Security without cuts. Have to do it.” In July 2015, he said, “The Republicans who want to cut SS &amp; Medicaid are wrong.” In <a href="https://www.vox.com/policy-and-politics/2017/6/23/15862312/trump-medicaid-promise">October 2015</a>, he said, “I am going to save Medicare and Medicaid.” In <a href="http://www.wtvm.com/story/31343747/donald-trump-rallies-in-valdosta">February 2016</a>, he said, “We're gonna save your Social Security without making any cuts. Mark my words.”</span></p> <p class="MsoNormal"><span style="font-size:12.0pt">&nbsp;</span></p> <p class="MsoNormal"><span style="font-size:12.0pt">Trump’s promise not to cut Social Security included explicit statements that he would not raise the retirement age, as he said in the Republican debate in March 2016. “And it’s my absolute intention to leave Social Security the way it is. Not increase the age and to leave it as is.”</span></p> <p class="MsoNormal"><span style="font-size:12.0pt">&nbsp;</span></p> <p class="MsoNormal"><span style="font-size:12.0pt">In fact, that was never his intention. In his book “The America We Deserve” in 2000, Trump compared Social Security to a Ponzi scheme and suggested that the <a href="https://www.snopes.com/trump-social-security/">retirement age be raised to 70</a>. In a private conversation with Paul Ryan after he won the nomination, Trump responded to Ryan’s plans to cut Social Security: “From a moral standpoint, <a href="https://www.bloomberg.com/features/2016-reince-priebus/">I believe in it</a>. But you also have to get elected. And there’s no way a Republican is going to beat a Democrat when the Republican is saying, ‘We’re going to cut your Social Security’ and the Democrat is saying, ‘We’re going to keep it and give you more.’”</span></p> <p class="MsoNormal"><span style="font-size:12.0pt">&nbsp;</span></p> <p class="MsoNormal"><span style="font-size:12.0pt">And that’s what happened. Trump convinced voters he would protect government programs which insured that average Americans would be able to get health care and retire with some financial dignity. Once he was President, he returned to his “moral standpoint”, the exact opposite of what he had promised.</span></p> <p class="MsoNormal"><span style="font-size:12.0pt">&nbsp;</span></p> <p class="MsoNormal"><span style="font-size:12.0pt">As soon as he was elected, he appointed former Dallas mayor Tom Leppert as his Social Security advisor. Leppert is in favor of <a href="http://money.cnn.com/2016/11/21/news/economy/kfile-trump-social-security/index.html">privatizing Social Security and Medicare</a>. Trump’s budget director Mick Mulvaney also <a href="http://social.fool.com/blog/43832531720">favors privatization</a>.</span></p> <p class="MsoNormal"><span style="font-size:12.0pt">&nbsp;</span></p> <p class="MsoNormal"><span style="font-size:12.0pt">In May 2017, Trump’s budget plan for 2018 proposed <a href="https://www.calhospital.org/cha-news-article/trump-budget-proposal-significantly-cuts-medicaid-other-safety-net-programs">drastic cuts in Medicaid</a>. In June, he supported the Republican Senate health care bill, which made <a href="https://www.nytimes.com/2017/06/22/us/politics/senate-health-care-bill.html">big cuts to Medicaid</a>.</span></p> <p class="MsoNormal"><span style="font-size:12.0pt">&nbsp;</span></p> <p class="MsoNormal"><span style="font-size:12.0pt">Now the White House has released a <a href="https://thinkprogress.org/trump-promises-cuts-medicare-medicaid-social-security-36a0e8a57ae0/">new Trump budget</a>, which makes huge cuts in Social Security, Medicare and Medicaid. Under the heading “Reform disability programs”, Trump proposes cuts in Social Security programs which support <a href="https://www.whitehouse.gov/wp-content/uploads/2018/02/budget-fy2019.pdf">poor and disabled Americans</a>, totaling $9 billion over the next four years and $72 billion over the next ten years. On the issue of how people will be affected, nobody could be clearer than budget director Mulvaney. When asked in the White House press room, “Will any of those individuals who receive SSDI receive less from this budget?” Mulvaney replied, <a href="http://thehill.com/blogs/pundits-blog/economy-budget/335618-the-trump-budget-cuts-social-security-plain-and-simple">“I hope so.”</a></span></p> <p class="MsoNormal"><span style="font-size:12.0pt">&nbsp;</span></p> <p class="MsoNormal"><span style="font-size:12.0pt">Funding for Medicare will be cut by $266 billion, mainly for patients who still need care after being discharged from hospitals. Medicaid will be cut by $1.1 trillion over ten years, by putting a cap on how much will be spent on individual patients.</span></p> <p class="MsoNormal"><span style="font-size:12.0pt">&nbsp;</span></p> <p class="MsoNormal"><span style="font-size:12.0pt">Other <a href="http://www.chicagotribune.com/news/nationworld/politics/ct-trump-budget-20180212-story.html">cuts in Trump’s budget</a>: Meals on Wheels, home heating assistance, and teacher training. He wants to eliminate the Corporation for Public Broadcasting, the National Endowment for the Arts and National Endowment for the Humanities.</span></p> <p class="MsoNormal"><span style="font-size:12.0pt">&nbsp;</span></p> <p class="MsoNormal"><span style="font-size:12.0pt">Every poll shows that <a href="https://www.americanprogress.org/issues/economy/news/2018/02/12/446453/trumps-budget-reveals-wants-everyday-americans-pay-tax-cuts-wealthy/">most Americans are opposed</a> to cutting Medicaid, Social Security, and the other welfare programs that Trump wants to cut or eliminate. So why is Trump ditching his promises not to cut these programs?</span></p> <p class="MsoNormal"><span style="font-size:12.0pt">&nbsp;</span></p> <p class="MsoNormal"><span style="font-size:12.0pt">A poll of voters before the 2016 election showed that Republicans, even more than Democrats, said they wanted a <a href="http://fortune.com/2016/04/01/poll-qualities-leadership/">leader with honesty</a>, and that was most true for voters with incomes under $50,000 a year. After the election, over 90% of Republican voters believed that Trump was “a strong and decisive leader” who <a href="http://news.gallup.com/poll/203915/americans-say-trump-keeps-promises-strong-leader.aspx">“keeps his promises”.</a></span></p> <p class="MsoNormal"><span style="font-size:12.0pt">&nbsp;</span></p> <p class="MsoNormal"><span style="font-size:12.0pt">It is hard to imagine a leader who is less honest than Trump. He has broken his promises about issues which hit Americans right in the wallet and pocketbook. It does take a “strong and decisive” person to repeatedly promise Americans that he will protect their interests in order to get elected, when he had no intention of doing so.</span></p> <p class="MsoNormal"><span style="font-size:12.0pt">&nbsp;</span></p> <p class="MsoNormal"><span style="font-size:12.0pt">Will Trump’s so-called “base” ever wake up? Does he have to shoot someone in the middle of Fifth Avenue before his supporters recognize who he is? Or was he right that even that won’t hurt him?</span></p> <p class="MsoNormal"><span style="font-size:12.0pt">&nbsp;</span></p> <p class="MsoNormal"><span style="font-size:12.0pt">Steve Hochstadt<span style="mso-tab-count:7">&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp; </span></span></p> <p class="MsoNormal"><span style="font-size:12.0pt">Berlin, Germany</span></p> <p class="MsoNormal"><span style="font-size:12.0pt">Published in the Jacksonville Journal-Courier, February 20, 2018</span></p>
ID: 154067
Uid: 4699
Author: 4
Category: 0
Title: The Revolutionary Drummer Boy Turned Haitian King
Source: The Daily Beast
Body: <p style="line-height: 29.5px; margin: 0px 0px 15px; font-size: 17px; color: rgb(2, 20, 31); font-family: Georgia, Cambria, &quot;Times New Roman&quot;, Times, serif;">Once upon a time, even the wild story of a 12-year-old American Revolutionary drummer boy becoming King of Haiti couldn’t interest Americans because he – along with his fellow soldiers – was black.&nbsp;</p><p style="line-height: 29.5px; margin: 0px 0px 15px; font-size: 17px; color: rgb(2, 20, 31); font-family: Georgia, Cambria, &quot;Times New Roman&quot;, Times, serif;">As with America in Vietnam, the British Army dominated militarily during the Revolution—until it lost. And like Vietnam, a local fight for independence from colonial rule became a global war.&nbsp;</p><p style="line-height: 29.5px; margin: 0px 0px 15px; font-size: 17px; color: rgb(2, 20, 31); font-family: Georgia, Cambria, &quot;Times New Roman&quot;, Times, serif;">In 1778, the British surprised American troops in Savannah and captured the city. Georgia was important enough strategically that French forces joined with their American allies to try liberating Savannah. On September 23, 1779, Admiral Charles-Hector Theodat d’Estaing, fresh from failing to dislodge the British from Newport, Rhode Island, demanded Savannah surrender. Four thousand French troops from the West Indies on 37 ships backed up his demand. Foolishly but nobly, he gave the British 24 hours to consider. The British fortified the ramparts and deployed reinforcements...</p><p style="line-height: 29.5px; margin: 0px 0px 15px; font-size: 17px; color: rgb(2, 20, 31); font-family: Georgia, Cambria, &quot;Times New Roman&quot;, Times, serif;"><a href="https://www.thedailybeast.com/the-revolutionary-drummer-boy-turned-haitian-king?ref=author">Read whole article on The Daily Beast.</a></p><div><br></div>