Roundup

This page features brief excerpts of stories published by the mainstream media and, less frequently, blogs, alternative media, and even obviously biased sources. The excerpts are taken directly from the websites cited in each source note. Quotation marks are not used.




  • Trump and the Return of Divine Right

    by David Armitage

    In deploying his pardon power freely and using the Bible to justify family separation, the president is exactly the sort of ruler that Enlightenment thinkers feared.



  • Meet the Trumpverstehers

    by Eliot A. Cohen

    We know about the president’s most vocal supporters. But what about his more discreet following?


  • Roundup Top 10!

    This week's broad sampling of opinion pieces found on the Internet, as selected by the editors of HNN.



  • The History Test

    by Jill Lepore

    How should the courts use history?



  • The George Soros philosophy – and its fatal flaw

    by Daniel Bessner

    Unlike most of the billionaire class, George Soros is not an out-of-touch plutocrat, but a provocative thinker committed to progressive ideals – which is what makes his failures so telling.



  • Ron Chernow on the Midterm Elections of 1866

    by Amy Davidson Sorkin

    In 1866, President Andrew Johnson pressured Ulysses S. Grant into joining him in a series of rallies where he aired his vulgarity and racism.



  • The Myth of the Liberal Order

    by Graham Allison

    Among the current, potentially mortal threats to the global order, Trump is one, but not the most important.


  • Roundup Top 10!

    This week's broad sampling of opinion pieces found on the Internet, as selected by the editors of HNN.



  • "Abolish ICE" is a massive political mistake

    by Julian Zelizer

    While focusing on ICE is an extremely important debate, and dismantling the agency might the be the best policy decision, it carries enormous short-term political risks for the Democrats going into the midterm elections.



  • More Devoted to Order Than to Justice

    by Ibram X. Kendi

    Political moderates who counsel against confrontation and warn of incivility would abandon the tools that have changed America for the better.