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Roundup

This page features brief excerpts of stories published by the mainstream media and, less frequently, blogs, alternative media, and even obviously biased sources. The excerpts are taken directly from the websites cited in each source note. Quotation marks are not used.




  • Are Elite Conservatives Getting Too Weird to Win?

    by Graham Gallagher

    The right's move toward European nationalism, conservative Catholicism, and other departures from domestic conservative tradition are troubling to scholars of reactionary politics. But they might just seem weird to voters. 



  • Staughton Lynd, 1929-2022

    by Rosemary Feurer

    Lynd was an academic and activist when those combinations were reviled as unbecoming of a professional, and he was blacklisted from the profession for his bold anti-war stance. He then made an impact as an activist for labor and against war. 



  • Despite Defeat, Iran's Footballers Won

    by Golnar Nikpour

    Iranian players' show of solidarity with protesters facing government repression has been more important than the results on the pitch. 



  • What Will Russia Look Like Without Putin?

    by Joy Neumayer

    A transformation of Russia after the end of Putin's leadership will require unwinding the countless institutions that have been molded and warped around his power for decades, so that another authoritarian can't step right in to use them. 



  • Republicans Can Thank Suburban New Yorkers for House Majority

    by Stacie Taranto

    The volatile politics of New York's downstate suburbs trace back to the settlement of massive suburban tracts outside the city after World War II, which created a large constituency of homeowners concerned with "law and order." 



  • Can Universities Protect Diverse Admissions and Excellence?

    by John Thelin

    The vastly improved technology available to college admissions officers means that a handful of selective institutions can serve the interest of both nominal diversity and elite reproduction, while exacerbating the divide in elementary and secondary educational quality in the nation. 



  • Reactionary Media are Fueling Anti-LGBTQ Violence

    by Ben Miller

    When the media give a platform to the idea that trans people living in public inherently encourages sexual abuse, violence aimed at removing them from the public will follow. The media need to take responsibility for Colorado Springs and call out icitement to violence. 



  • What the AHA President Got Wrong—and Right

    by Jonathan Wilson

    "History is political because human experience is political. Historians have power, or at least we want them to. We require that secondary-school and university students study history because we hope it will shape their behavior as citizens."



  • Grad Workers: Choose Solidarity with New Haven

    by Adom Getachew and Sarah Haley

    Two former Yale PhD students argue that the university's graduate student union offers not just benefits and protection to graduate student workers, but the chance for them to work in solidarity with other university and New Haven workers across the vast racial and socioeconomic divides separating city and campus. 



  • From Solidarity to Shock Therapy: The AFL-CIO and the End of the Cold War

    by Jeff Schuhrke

    The AFL-CIO's leadership saw the emergence of the Polish Solidarity movement in 1980 as an opportunity to advance their anticommunist agenda. Did they also undermine the ability of a post-Soviet left to protect workers' interests against global capitalism? 



  • Postcard From Detroit

    by Mattie Webb

    The city of Detroit is a fitting location for an archive documenting not only American labor history but the connections between US-based unions and the antiapartheid movement in South Africa. 



  • The US-China Relationship: Why It Collapsed, How it Can Be Fixed

    by Jake Werner

    The split between the US and China precedes the leadership of Biden, Trump, and Xi, as politicians in both countries have increasingly come to see the others' prosperity as a threat. Solving the split requires looking to the problems of global market capitalism that exacerbated the rift. 



  • Blacks and Jews—Again

    by Michael Eric Dyson

    At a moment of rising authoritarianism in America and the world, it is necessary for Black America and American Jews to recognize antisemitism as a species of white supremacy that threatens both groups.