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Roundup

This page features brief excerpts of stories published by the mainstream media and, less frequently, blogs, alternative media, and even obviously biased sources. The excerpts are taken directly from the websites cited in each source note. Quotation marks are not used.




  • Remember, Lee Betrayed His Country

    by Walter Kamphoefner

    The removal of Robert E. Lee's statue in Richmond was a necessary step in the halting American version of Germany's Vergangenheitsbewältigung – facing the evils of the nation's past. 



  • Teach the Truth About America's Less Than Glorious History

    by Richard T. Hughes

    "Not a single student in my class professed to know anything at all about this tragic chapter in our nation’s history. I shouldn’t have been surprised. We witness every day similar ignorance, coupled with a persistent reluctance to acknowledge our nation’s crimes."



  • The New Front in the War for Voting Rights

    by Jim Zirin

    The 15th Amendment empowers Congress to enforce the amendment and the right to vote with "appropriate legislation." With Republicans committed to vote suppression, the Democrats must act unilaterally.   



  • Why Didn't We Leave Afghanistan Before Now?

    by Carter Malkasian

    Above all other considerations, America's interminable military presence in Afghanistan was driven by politicians' fears of blame for a future terrorist attack. 



  • The Captive Photograph

    by Ariella Azoulay

    The taking of photographs of enslaved people by Harvard scientist Louis Agassiz, and the university's continued ownership of those images, constitute a crime against humanity, argues a theorist and historian of visual culture. The images demand an ethic of care to replace an ethic of ownership, which is a model for restorative justice for slavery.



  • Fin de Siecle Vienna: Art and Culture in Schorske's Century

    by Thomas Bender

    Carl Schorske's work on 19th Century Vienna was a masterwork of intellectual history that incorporated interdisciplinary approaches to politics and culture to model new approaches to scholarship in the humanities. A colleague traces his intellectual development.



  • Why a Liberal Education is Worth Defending

    by Steve Mintz

    Roosevelt Montas’s forthcoming "Rescuing Socrates: How the Great Books Changed My Life and Why They Matter for a New Generation" makes a powerful case for engagment with the Great Books as a way to subvert hierarchies and promote equity. 



  • Climate Anxiety and the Return of Arctic Horror

    by Bathsheba Demuth

    As climate change driven by capitalism threatens the polar ice caps, new miniseries return to the themes of arctic exploration, where cold and ice threaten humans and commerce, rather than the other way around. 



  • Debate and Controversy are Essential to History Education

    by Robert Cohen and Sonia Murrow

    Claims that critical perspectives on US history are "divisive" or "disruptive" or teach students to "hate America" were wrong in the 1980s, and are being repeated today. Educators must be free to serve the needs of students to compare, evaluate and debate. 



  • Why Are Moderate Dems Trying to Blow Up Biden's Economic Plan?

    by Zachary D. Carter

    Centrists' efforts to chisel away at the Build Back Better bill threaten its passage, its effectiveness, and the prospects of Democrats to hold power in the future. A biographer of John Maynard Keynes wonders why they're doing it. 



  • Peering Into Windows and Wombs: Reflections on SB 8

    by Gillian Frank

    "Even as abortion opponents loudly proclaim they are acting by divine mandate, people of faith like Dr. Curtis Boyd remain on the frontlines of this battle for reproductive healthcare."



  • No, John Calhoun Didn't Invent the Filibuster

    by Robert Elder

    A new book castigating the filibuster traces it back to the parliamentary maneuvers of pro-slavery ideologue John C. Calhoun. One needn't embrace either Calhoun or the filibuster to recognize this is historically incorrect. 



  • The Profits of War

    by William Hartung

    Between weapons systems and a shadow army of contractors and logistics consultants, the War on Terror has been a bonanza for large corporations that shows no signs of abating. 



  • The Culture War Over Schools Is Worse Than Ever

    by Jonathan Zimmerman

    The 20th century pluralist strategy to resolve the "history wars" – including examples of heroes and leaders representing progressively more social groups – is no longer able to cover over fundamental conflicts over what America is and what students should learn about the nation. 



  • After Afghanistan: Will Peace Get a Chance?

    by William Astore

    "Here’s the rest of my message to my fellow citizens. Stop rewarding the Pentagon and its failed generals and admirals with yet more money."



  • Homelessness and Eviction in the Land of the Free

    by Liz Theoharis

    Homeless activists in the 1980s and 1990s began to push back against the narrative that mass homelessness reflected the defects of individuals instead of a profit-driven housing system. As the Supreme Court has thrown out a federal eviction moratorium, that lesson is more relevant than ever. 



  • The Myth of "Open Borders"

    by Anna O. Law

    Recent efforts by Texas and other states to claim the power to apprehend suspected undocumented immigrants reflects a conflict of federalism that traces back to the efforts of slave states to control the movement of free Black people in their territories and of northern states to keep out poor immigrants.