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Historians/History


  • On Writing The Bright Ages

    by David M. Perry and Matthew Gabriele

    The authors of a new book reconsidering the history of the medieval world describe how the project came about and how the work of writing history benefits by collaboration.


  • What if Hannibal Had Won?

    by Philip Freeman

    Historians' dependence on the accounts of Roman historians has distorted modern understanding of Hannibal, the Carthaginians, and the different possibilities for the world if he had succeeded in defeating Rome.


  • The Accident that Almost Decapitated the US Government

    by Stan Haynes

    John Tyler intended to show off the firepower of the USS Princeton to boost his abysmal popularity and scare foreign goverments into letting him annex Texas. He nearly got more than he bargained for in one of the biggest close calls of presidential history. 


  • Writing a Classic: Richard Tregaskis and "Guadalcanal Diary"

    by Ray E. Boomhower

    Combat reporter Richard Tregaskis's account of the August 1942 Marine invasion of Guadalcanal in the Solomon Islands passed military censors and became a popular sensation while offering the public an account of the difficulty and brutality of the Pacific war.


  • Remember the Army's Role in the Pacific War: Important Then, Influential Afterward

    by John C. McManus

    During the second World War and after, the Marine Corps has received admiration and attention for its role in the Pacific, but the Army carried out a huge number of invasions and performed the logistics other services depended on. The Army's experiences in WWII also were foundational, for good and ill, for the next half-century of American war. 


  • Latitude: The Pioneering International Mission to Measure the Earth

    by Nicholas Crane

    The scientists and technicians of the Geodetic Mission to the Equator did more than measure a degree of latitude; they showed how a disparate group of human beings from different countries and backgrounds could pool their collective resources and solve problems.


  • The Japanese Surrender in 1945 is Still Poorly Understood

    by Jeremy Kuzmarov and Roger Peace

    American diplomats and military leadership in 1945 believed Japan was close to a negotiated surrender without the use of the atomic bomb, a history that has since been replaced by the myth that the bomb saved lives. 


  • Group of Historians Recognized for Best SCOTUS Brief of the Year

    by Ronald A. Smith

    A group of six historians has been recognized by the Education Law Association for the best Supreme Court brief of the year. Their historical deconstruction of the myth of amateurism in college athletics influenced a unanimous decision that the NCAA cannot bar college athletes from profiting from the commercial use of their names, images, or likenesses.


  • Untold Stories from the Largest Boat Lift in History

    by Jessica DuLong

    On September 11, 2001, nearly half a million civilians in Lower Manhattan escaped by water when mariners conducted a spontaneous rescue. This was the largest waterborne evacuation in history, but has gone largely untold.