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Vladimir Putin



  • Will Putin Learn from Stalin's Mistakes over Korea?

    by Gregory Mitrovich

    Stalin's support for the North Korean invasion of the south galvanized Western opposition and ensured that the Cold War would be militarized, instead of remaining a diplomatic and economic conflict. In the long run, the Soviets lost. 



  • Only Putin Knows What's Next

    by Tom Nichols

    Vladimir Putin's intentions – be they territorial, symbolic, or psychological – remain a wild card for any U.S.-led response to the Ukraine situation. 



  • Orban and Putin Don't do Debates Either

    by Ruth Ben-Ghiat

    The news that the Republican National Committee will boycott the Commission on Presidential Debates echoes the actions of authoritarians who reject the principle of political toleration and the very legitimacy of the opposition. 



  • History Helps Discern Putin's Ukraine Agenda

    by Kathryn David

    Russia today uses the ideological work of Soviet-era historians that claims a fundamental unity between Russian and Ukrainian people to justify its expansionist aims. 


  • The Return of Human Rights on the American Agenda?

    by Richard Moe

    One of Jimmy Carter's legacies, albeit erratically observed, has been the assertion of human rights as a foreign policy priority. After four years of ignoring the issue, will the US under Joe Biden reclaim leadership in high-stakes relationships with Russia and Saudi Arabia? 



  • The new authoritarians

    by Holly Case

    Last century’s dictators wanted to reinvent their subjects as "new men." This century’s strongmen just don’t care. Why?


  • Vladimir Putin: History Man?

    by Walter G. Moss

    Putin is far from unique among politicians in attempting to manipulate history. But a true “history man” is primarily a truth-seeker. He fails in this.


  • Enough With the Hitler Analogies

    by Christian Karner

    Our understanding of World War II has been deeply enriched by a memory boom of books and research. The same cannot be said by the Hitler analogy boom.



  • Cold Man in the Kremlin

    by Roger Cohen

    When Putin described the breakup of the Soviet Union as the “greatest geopolitical catastrophe” of the 20th century, he meant it.