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Displaying 25741-25750 of 25866 results.
ID: 153887
Uid: 14552
Author: 13
Category: 0
Title: Life During Wartime
Source:
Body: <img src="http://www.joshbrownnyc.com/images/ldw467.jpg">
ID: 153888
Uid: 4699
Author: 4
Category: 0
Title: She Was the Steve Bannon of the Great Depression
Source: The Daily Beast
Body: <div class="Text" style="margin-bottom: 18px; color: rgb(2, 20, 31); font-family: Georgia, Cambria, 'Times New Roman', Times, serif; line-height: 0px; background-color: rgb(255, 255, 255);"><p style="line-height: 29.5px; margin: 0px; font-size: 17px;">When she smiled her face could look cherubic, with wide eyes and chubby cheeks conveying a calm she rarely felt. In fact, she became famous by twisting her face with such disgust and issuing such cutting remarks she could have been the Gold Medalist in demonization as America’s Animosity Olympics—1930s and 1940s edition—peaked.</p></div><div class="Text" style="margin-bottom: 18px; color: rgb(2, 20, 31); font-family: Georgia, Cambria, 'Times New Roman', Times, serif; line-height: 0px; background-color: rgb(255, 255, 255);"><p style="line-height: 29.5px; margin: 0px; font-size: 17px;">She joined the chorus screeching “AMERICA FIRST!”—putting American values of tolerance, decency, and equality last. She hated blacks. She hated Communists. She hated the Roosevelts. But most of all she hated Jews. Indeed, Elizabeth Dilling earned the nickname a Nazi newspaper gave her: “the female Fuhrer.”</p></div><div class="Text" style="margin-bottom: 18px; color: rgb(2, 20, 31); font-family: Georgia, Cambria, 'Times New Roman', Times, serif; line-height: 0px; background-color: rgb(255, 255, 255);"><p style="line-height: 29.5px; margin: 0px; font-size: 17px;">In a twisted salute to womanpower, this Chicagoland matron competed with the populist demagogues Father Charles Coughlin and Gerald L.K. Smith in denouncing what they called Franklin Roosevelt’s “Jew Deal” and Communism as an international Jewish conspiracy. Born in Chicago as Elizabeth Kirkpatrick in 1894, married to a wealthy lawyer Albert Dilling in 1918, this anxious, frustrated woman exploited the era’s anxieties, trying to make everyone else as miserable as she was...</p><p style="line-height: 29.5px; margin: 0px; font-size: 17px;"><a href="http://www.thedailybeast.com/articles/2017/02/04/she-was-the-steve-bannon-of-the-great-depression.html"><i>Read whole article on The Daily Beast.</i></a></p></div>
ID: 153889
Uid: 14552
Author: 13
Category: 0
Title: Life during Wartime - The Toch Bros. Meet President Heffalump, Part 2
Source:
Body: <img src="http://www.joshbrownnyc.com/images/ldw468.jpg">
ID: 153890
Uid: 14552
Author: 13
Category: 0
Title: Life during Wartime - The Victim!
Source:
Body: <img src="http://www.joshbrownnyc.com/images/ldw469.jpg"><br>
ID: 153891
Uid: 341
Author: 40
Category: 0
Title: Whose Kids Are Ready to Fight and Die for Kiev and Tallinn?
Source:
Body: <p></p><p style="text-align: center;"><img src=" /sites/default/files/153891-putin1.png"></p><p style="text-align: center;"><span style="font-size: smaller;">Putin commemorating 9-11 in NYC 2001&nbsp;</span><font size="2">&nbsp;–&nbsp;</font><span style="font-size: smaller;">&nbsp;Kremlin.ru </span><a href="http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/3.0" style="font-size: smaller;">CC BY 3.0</a><span style="font-size: smaller;">&nbsp; via Wikimedia Commons</span></p><p><i> This post is by Murray Polner,&nbsp; a blogger, writer and HNN’s senior Book Department editor.</i></p><p>While analyzing Vladimir Putin, our latest foreign devil, I wonder if many of our born-again Russian experts could pass a simple exam evaluating and explaining the possible impact of Russia’s past on him. How many know enough about Russian history to know about Mikhail Bakunin, Alexander Herzen, Nicholas I, &nbsp;the Crimean War, Nestor Makhno, Konstantin Pobedonostsev, Anton Denikin, &nbsp;Serge Witte, P.N. Wrangel, A.V. Kolchak, the Czech Legion, the Cordon Sanitaire, or even U.S. General William Graves on their &nbsp;relevance to &nbsp;current Russian history? Would they know anything about Nicholai Danilevsky, who dreamed up Pan-Slavism, a principle based on the hypothesis that a common cultural tie and language formed a brotherhood, or at least ought to form one, among Slavic people? My guess is that most are instant experts. What we now see and read is offered up with barely a hint of dissent. </p> <p>Many have tried to understand Putin's Russia. A plausible explanation came from Fiona Hill, who once worked in the Bush II, administration and co-wrote <i>Mr. Putin: Operative in the Kremlin.</i> “He’s not delusional, but he’s inhabiting a Russia of the past, a version of the past that he has created. His present is defined by it and there is no coherent vision of the future.” </p> <p>Like most world leaders yesterday and especially today. </p> <p>From Moscow,&nbsp; Shaun Walker, the <i>Guardian’s</i> reporter, asked, “What is Putin thinking?” and then &nbsp;describes his and Russia’s “deep-seated sense of injustice of&nbsp; unfair victimization from the west” because of&nbsp; “an unwillingness to take Russia’s interests into account. Walker goes on to describe the thinking of Russia’s elite: “This ideology envisions Russia’s emergence as&nbsp; a&nbsp; conservative world power in direct opposition to the geopolitical hegemony and liberal values of the west” &nbsp;– a hint of a Romanov-like restoration?</p> <p>In the meantime, Baltic and East European nations are assured and reassured by U.S. politicians that Article 5 of NATO mandates that, if attacked (by Putin’s Russia, who else?), the U.S., a charter member, will be required to spring to its defense and then our officials will once again have to urge Americans to tell their kids to hide under their school desks when they hear the alarms and get their sons ready to be drafted. </p> <p>“The U.S. has treated Russia like a loser since the end of the Cold War,” wrote our former ambassador to Moscow, the non-conforming and shrewd Jack Matlock, Jr. in the <i>Washington</i><i> Post.</i> &nbsp;When NATO moved eastward and dangled membership to Russia’s neighbors, Moscow objected, interpreting the moves as nothing less than encirclement. Putin worked with the U.S. when it invaded Afghanistan and also abandoned its bases in Cam Ranh Bay in Vietnam and Cuba, Matlock reminded us. In return, NATO reached into the Balkans and Baltics, invaded Iraq without Security Council endorsement, involved itself in the “Orange Revolutions” of Georgia, Ukraine and Kyrgyzstan while hinting that it also might include Georgia and Ukraine, former SSRs. </p> <p>With little or no historical knowledge “Americans, inheritors of the Monroe Doctrine, should have understood that Russia would be hypersensitive to foreign dominated military alliances approaching or touching its borders.” Crimea, he warns, worsens the break between east and west, a situation where “there would be no winners, only losers, most of all Ukraine itself” and, I add, an angry, isolated, bitter and uncompromising nuclear rivalry. </p> <p>I recently turned to historians who, while not defending recent Russian moves, are trying to understand, even if our domestic hawks equate “understand” with “Munich.” Diplomatic historian Sheldon Stern’s “<a href="http://historynewsnetwork.org/article/155023">Putin Didn’t Seize Crimea Because Obama is ‘Weak’ </a>” tells us that “It would be surprising if Putin did not intervene in the Crimea after President Yanukovych’s overthrow threatened Russia’s access to its warm water base in Sevastopol and its political influence in Kiev. He then cites Daniel Larison, a historian and blogger for the paleo-con <i>The American Conservative</i>: “Russia behaved the way that it has because it already thought that western interference in Ukraine was too great.” </p> <p>Mark&nbsp; Sternberg has just edited the eighth edition of Nicholas Riasanovsky’s definitive <i>A History of Russia</i> and is now writing a history of the Russian Revolution. In “Putin’s Russia is Far More Complicated than A Mere Autocracy,” he draws attention to what he views as a serious misinterpretation drawn from Churchill’s famous Westminster College speech in 1946, when he warned the west about his former ally Stalin.</p> <p>&nbsp;“Winston Churchill famously called Russia ‘a riddle, wrapped in a mystery, inside an enigma’ – a phrase that makes me cringe when it shows up in contemporary journalism…. Part of the problem is that we forget Churchill’s point: There is a '<i>Russian national interest'</i> ” (my italics). </p> <p>Dreams of unlimited pretensions of near-perfection are natural in the West. Putin went out of his way in his St. George’s Hall speech to deride American posturing “in their exclusivity and exceptionalism, that they can decide the destinies of the world that only they can ever be right.” <br></p><p>Western “demonization of &nbsp;Vladimir Putin is&nbsp; not a policy; it is an alibi for the absence of one” said the cynical, occasionally realistic Henry Kissinger in the <i>Washington</i><i> Post.</i> He suggests the U.S. goal should be to seek a way&nbsp; for the two Ukraines to work together, and we not favoring the dominion of one side or the other. “We should seek reconciliation, not the domination of a faction.” </p> <p>Western/American policy remains unknown and confusing. &nbsp;Perhaps the U.S. has been too naïve about post-Soviet Russia, or conversely, dismissed its anxieties and interests too hastily. Still, the&nbsp; best outcome of the complex Crimean mess is to take it slow, very slow. I don’t always agree with Ross Douthat, the <i>Times’s</i> brainy and conservative Op Ed columnist, but he’s on to something. Bismarck managed to keep the peace in Europe after a series of wars, and handed down to us his pithy reminder that his generation’s Balkan crises weren’t worth the bones of "a Pomeranian Grenadier." &nbsp;Echoing the great European &nbsp;conservative and unlike some demented neocons and liberal hawks, Douthat &nbsp;wisely writes that “even the most bellicose U.S. politicians aren't ready to say that South Ossetia or Simferopol is worth the bones of a single American marine.” </p> <p>"Where Douthat is right is in recognizing that our treacherous tit-for-tat contest with Russia has to slow down before someone shoots a modern-day version of the poor Austrian Archduke. In his real life genuine conservative mode, Douthat properly calls for 'Balance,' &nbsp;explaining that, in dealing with an [allegedly] weak and [potentially] treacherous Russia, &nbsp;the U.S. 'has been both too naïve about Putin’s intentions and too incautious in its commitments and that a new containment need not require a new Cold War.' ” Then he comes to his main and eminently sensible&nbsp; point. “When illusions are shattered, it’s easy to become reckless, easy to hand-wring and retrench. What we need instead is realism: to use the powers we have, without pretending to powers that we lack.” </p> <p>&nbsp;It’s as far as we dare go in a nuclear age. And that goes for Moscow and Washington and the rest of the members of the Nuclear Club. </p>
ID: 153892
Uid: 78605
Author: 42
Category: 0
Title: Academic opposition to Trump's Muslim ban
Source:
Body: <p>Getting academics to work together is often, as the old joke goes, like herding cats.&nbsp; So what did it take to get scores of scientific and academic organizations to act together?&nbsp; The answer is President Trump’s January 27 blanket banning, now temporarily stayed by court order, certain groups of Muslims from entering the United States.&nbsp; The objections are both abstract and personal.&nbsp; From the perspective of the former, travel restrictions on people (who were already vetted by the U.S. government) harm the flow of information and ideas, hurting the economy as well as the advancement of science and technology.&nbsp; Less abstractly, the order affected nearly <a href="http://college.usatoday.com/2017/02/03/trump-travel-ban-international-students/">24,000 students,</a> including 273 at my institution, Texas A&amp;M.&nbsp; </p> <p>In ascending order are a statement&nbsp;from the Society for the History of Technology (SHOT), a superbly historical contribution from the American Historical Association (AHA), and a letter from 180 scientific organizations and institutions focusing on how this ban will harm the United States.&nbsp; </p> <p><b><a href="http://www.historyoftechnology.org/media/ECdocs/SHOT_Statement_Feb_7_2017.pdf">Statement</a> by the Officers and Executive Council of the Society for the History of Technology (SHOT) regarding immigration policy changes in the US</b></p> <p><b>Feb 7, 2017</b>&nbsp;</p> <p>The Society for the History of Technology is committed to academic freedom, freedom of expression, and fostering diversity with regard to age, gender, race, ethnicity, nation of origin, physical abilities, sexual orientation, religion, training, and employment. To this end, SHOT affirmatively embraces all who wish to join, participate, and have a voice in our Society.&nbsp;</p> <p>The United States Executive Order of January 27, 2017, “Protecting the Nation from Foreign Terrorist Entry into The United States” challenges these core values.&nbsp;&nbsp;The Society for the History of Technology registers its principled opposition to any blanket travel ban that targets entire countries, covering not only millions of their inhabitants but also numerous others living&nbsp;around the world who happen to have been born in the designated countries. Such bans are impossible to implement in a way that respects basic principles of justice and human rights, and they are profoundly at odds with the reality of our globalized world. </p> <p>Knowledge creation in the history of technology—as in most intellectual domains—fundamentally depends on international mobility for research and the diffusion and exchange of ideas.&nbsp;&nbsp;The present travel ban issued by the United States will have a significant and detrimental impact on the ability of SHOT members, students, and colleagues to conduct their research and professional obligations.&nbsp;&nbsp;Just as worrying are long-term unintended consequences that include diminished international cooperation, loss of trust in the possibility of an open and tolerant global society, and erosion of the many social and economic benefits that flow from the production and exchange of knowledge.</p> <p>The Officers and Executive Council of the Society for the History of Technology agree with the statement issued by the American Historical Association and urge members to read it at:</p> <p><a href="http://blog.historians.org/2017/01/aha-condemns-executive-order-restricting-entry-united-states/">http://blog.historians.org/2017/01/aha-condemns-executive-order-restricting-entry-united-states/</a></p> <p>The Local Organizing Committee for the SHOT Annual Meeting in Philadelphia in October this year has organized a Round Table on the conference theme Technology, Democracy and Participation.&nbsp; We urge members to propose similarly pertinent topics to the Program Committee.</p> <p>With regard to the forthcoming annual meeting the Officers and Executive Council agree that</p> <p>1.&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;Registered participants who are denied a visa or entry (even with a visa) to the United States for the meeting will have their registration fees refunded.</p> <p>2.&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;If a speaker accepted by the Program Committee is unable to attend the meeting due to their entry to the US being impeded by federal regulations, we undertake to do our best to make alternative arrangements for the speaker to present her or his paper via skype or a similar communications system.</p> <p>3.&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;While some participants who can travel freely may be reluctant to attend the meeting if current immigration policies remain in force, we strongly encourage everyone who can to come to Philadelphia.&nbsp; This will help affirm our determination to remain an international organization in this changed reality and to limit the damage to our Society and its core values.&nbsp;</p> <p>&nbsp;4. &nbsp;&nbsp;As a 501(c)(3) non-profit organization SHOT does not take partisan stands on policy issues.</p> <p><b><a href="http://blog.historians.org/2017/01/aha-condemns-executive-order-restricting-entry-united-states/">AHA Condemns Executive Order Restricting Entry to the United States</a></b>January 30, 2017 &nbsp; </p> <p>The American Historical Association strongly condemns the executive order issued by President Donald J. Trump on January 27 purportedly “protecting the nation from foreign terrorist entry into the United States.” Historians look first to evidence: deaths from terrorism in the United States in the last fifteen years have come at the hands of native-born citizens and people from countries other than the seven singled out for exclusion in the order. Attention to evidence raises the question as to whether the order actually speaks to the dangers of foreign terrorism.</p> <p>It is more clear that the order will have a significant and detrimental impact on thousands of innocent people, whether inhabitants of refugee camps across the world who have waited months or even years for interviews scheduled in the coming month (now canceled), travelers en route to the United States with valid visas or other documentation, or other categories of residents of the United States, including many of our students and colleagues.</p> <p>The AHA urges the policy community to learn from our nation’s history. Formulating or analyzing policy by historical analogy admittedly can be dangerous; context matters. But the past does provide warnings, especially given advantages of hindsight. What we have seen before can help us understand possible implications of the executive order. The most striking example of American refusal to admit refugees was during the 1930s, when Jews and others fled Nazi Germany. A combination of hostility toward a particular religious group combined with suspicions of disloyalty and potential subversion by supposed radicals anxious to undermine our democracy contributed to exclusionist administrative procedures that slammed shut the doors on millions of refugees. Many were subsequently systematically murdered as part of the German “final solution to the Jewish question.” Ironically, President Trump issued his executive order on Holocaust Remembrance Day.</p> <p>Conversely, when refugees have found their way to our shores, the United States has benefited from their talents and energy. Our own discipline has been enriched by individuals fleeing their homelands. The distinguished historian of Germany Hajo Holborn arrived in 1934 from Germany. Gerda Lerner, a major force in the rise of women’s history, fled Austria in 1939. Civil War historian Gabor Boritt found refuge in the United States after participating in the 1956 uprising in Hungary. More recently, immigration scholar Maria Cristina Garcia fled Fidel Castro’s Cuba with her parents in 1961. The list is long and could be replicated in nearly every discipline.</p> <p>We have good reason to fear that the executive order will harm historians and historical research both in the United States and abroad. The AHA represents teachers and researchers who study and teach history throughout the world. Essential to that endeavor are interactions with foreign colleagues and access to archives and conferences overseas. The executive order threatens global scholarly networks our members have built up over decades. It establishes a religious test for scholars, favoring Christians over Muslims from the affected countries; and it jeopardizes both travel and the exchange of ideas upon which all scholarship ultimately depends. It directly threatens individuals currently studying history in our universities and colleges, as well as our ability to attract international students in the future. It also raises the possibility that other countries may retaliate by imposing similar restrictions on American teachers and students. By banning these nations’ best and brightest from attending American universities, the executive order is likely to increase anti-Americanism among their next generation of leaders, with fearsome consequences for our future national security.</p> <p>Supreme Court Justice Thurgood Marshall, like many of his colleagues before and since, did think historically in ways that should inform consideration of President Trump’s executive order. In a 1989 dissent (<i>Skinner v. Railway Executives Association</i>), Justice Marshall observed: “History teaches that grave threats to liberty often come in time of urgency, when constitutional rights seem too extravagant to endure. The World War II Relocation–camp cases and the Red Scare and McCarthy-era internal subversion cases are only the most extreme reminders that when we allow fundamental freedoms to be sacrificed in the name of real or perceived exigency, we invariably come to regret it.”</p> <p><b>This post has been updated to list the following affiliated societies’ endorsement of the above statement:</b><br> American Academy of Research Historians of Medieval Spain<br> American Association for State and Local History<br> American Society for Environmental History<br> American Society for Legal History<br> American Society of Church History<br> Association for Computers and the Humanities<br> Association for Israel Studies<br> Berkshire Conference of Women Historians<br> Business History Conference<br> Central European History Society<br> Chinese Historians in the United States<br> Committee on LGBT History<br> Conference on Asian History<br> Conference on Latin American History<br> Coordinating Council for Women in History<br> Disability History Association<br> Forum on European Expansion and Global Interaction<br> French Colonial Historical Society<br> Historical Society for Twentieth Century China<br> History of Science Society<br> Hungarian Studies Association<br> Immigration and Ethnic History Society<br> International Society for the Scholarship of Teaching and Learning in History<br> Labor and Working Class History Association<br> MARHO: The Radical Historians’ Organization<br> National Council on Public History<br> New England Historical Association<br> North American Conference on British Studies<br> Organization of American Historians<br> Pacific Coast Branch, American Historical Association<br> Rocky Mountain Council of Latin American Studies<br> Roy Rosenzweig Center for History and New Media<br> Social Science History Association<br> Social Welfare History Group<br> Society for Advancing the History of South Asia<br> Society for Austrian and Habsburg History<br> Society for French Historical Studies<br> Society for Historians of American Foreign Relations<br> Society for Historians of the Gilded Age and Progressive Era<br> Society for Italian Historical Studies<br> Society for the History of Authorship, Reading and Publishing<br> Society for the History of Children and Youth<br> Society for the History of Technology (SHOT)<br> Southern Historical Association<br> Southern Jewish Historical Society<br> Toynbee Prize Foundation<br> Urban History Association<br> Western Association of Women Historians<br> Western History Association<br> World History Association</p> <p>Finally,</p><p><b>160+ Science Organizations Urge President to Rescind Immigration Order</b></p><p>Publication date:&nbsp;</p> <p>1 February 2017</p> <p>In a letter to President Donald Trump, the organizations warn that his executive order temporarily barring citizens of seven&nbsp;nations from entering the U.S. will negatively impact the nation’s science and engineering capacity.</p> <p>As of today, over 160 scientific societies, universities, and other science organizations have signed onto a&nbsp;<a href="https://mcmprodaaas.s3.amazonaws.com/s3fs-public/Multisociety%20Letter%20on%20Immigration%201-31-2017.pdf">letter</a>&nbsp;to President Trump warning of harm to the U.S. scientific enterprise as a result of the president’s recent executive order on immigration. Urging him to rescind the order, the organizations say it will block the open flow of scientists and engineers in industry and academia, discourage top international students and scholars from studying and working in the U.S., and reduce science and engineering productivity.</p> <p>The executive order, which Trump signed on Jan. 27, imposes a 90-day ban on entry to the U.S. by citizens of seven&nbsp;nations -- Iran, Iraq, Syria, Yemen, Somalia, Libya, and Sudan. The order also suspends the admittance of refugees awaiting resettlement in the U.S. for 120 days&nbsp;and indefinitely bars the admittance of Syrian refugees.</p> <p>According to&nbsp;<a href="http://www.nature.com/news/meet-the-scientists-affected-by-trump-s-immigration-ban-1.21389">reports</a>&nbsp;in the media, multiple students, postdoctoral fellows, and professors from affected countries were stranded abroad or detained at airports following the order. Existing scientific collaborations, career plans, and conference attendance have been disrupted. And a number of U.S.-based scientific societies have indicated they may be compelled to hold conferences outside of the U.S. to ensure that all scholars in their field of science are able to attend.</p> <p>Dear President Trump: </p> <p>The January 27, 2017, White House Executive Order on visas and immigration has profound implications for diplomatic, humanitarian, and national security interests, in part because of the negative impact on U.S. science and engineering capacity. </p> <p>The 180 undersigned organizations – representing a broad spectrum of professional scientific, engineering and education societies, national associations, and universities – are deeply concerned that this Executive Order will have a negative impact on the ability of scientists and engineers in industry and academia to enter, or leave from and return to, the United States. This will reduce U.S. science and engineering output to the detriment of America and Americans.</p> <p>Scientific progress depends on openness, transparency, and the free flow of ideas and people, and these principles have helped the United States attract and richly benefit from international scientific talent. From the Apollo Program and exploring the far reaches of the universe, to advancing biomedical research for curing diseases and harnessing science to build a thriving high-tech sector, the United States is considered a leader in science, education and innovation. In order to remain the world leader in advancing scientific knowledge and innovations, the U.S. science and technology enterprise must continue to capitalize on the international and multicultural environment within which it operates. </p> <p>The Executive Order will discourage many of the best and brightest international students, scholars, engineers and scientists from studying and working, attending academic and scientific conferences, or seeking to build new businesses in the United States. Implementation of this policy will compromise the United States’ ability to attract international scientific talent and maintain scientific and economic leadership. </p> <p>Today, we urge the Administration to rescind the Executive Order and we stand ready to assist you in crafting an immigration and visa policy that advances U.S. prosperity and ensures strong borders while staying true to foundational American principles as a nation of immigrants. </p> <p>Sincerely, </p> <p>American Association for the Advancement of Science AACC International Academy for Eating Disorders Academy for Radiology &amp; Biomedical Imaging Research Acoustical Society of America Academy of Criminal Justice Sciences American Academy of Forensic Sciences American Anthropological Association American Association for Clinical Chemistry American Association of Colleges of Pharmacy American Association for Dental Research American Association of Geographers American Association of Immunologists American Association of Pharmaceutical Scientists American Association of Physical Anthropologists American Association of Physicists in Medicine American Association of Physics Teachers American Association for Public Opinion Research American Association for the Study of Liver Diseases American Astronomical Society American Brain Coalition American Chemical Society American College of Neuropsychopharmacology American Dental Education Association American Educational Research Association American Federation for Medical Research American Geophysical Union American Geosciences Institute American Institute of Biological Sciences American Institute of Aeronautics and Astronautics American Institute of Chemical Engineers American Institute of Physics American Mathematical Society American Meteorological Society American Ornithological Society American Physical Society American Physiological Society American Phytopathological Society American Political Science Association American Psychological Association American Public Health Association American Society of Agricultural and Biological Engineers American Society of Agronomy American Society of Animal Science American Society of Association Executives American Society for Biochemistry and Molecular Biology American Society for Cell Biology American Society of Civil Engineers American Society for Clinical Pharmacology &amp; Therapeutics American Society of Clinical Psychopharmacology American Society for Horticultural Science American Society for Microbiology American Society of Naturalists American Society for Pharmacology and Experimental Therapeutics American Society of Plant Biologists American Society of Plant Taxonomists American Society of Tropical Medicine and Hygiene American Sociological Association American Statistical Association Archeological Institute of America Associated Universities, Inc. Association for Behavior Analysis International Association of Research Libraries Association of American Medical Colleges Association of American Universities Association of Independent Research Institutes Association for Psychological Science Association for Research in Vision and Ophthalmology Association of Schools and Colleges of Optometry Association for the Sciences of Limnology and Oceanography Association of Southeastern Biologists Association for Women in Mathematics Behavior Genetics Association Biomedical Engineering Society Biophysical Society Boston University Botanical Society of America Brown University California Institute of Technology Cognitive Science Society Columbia University in the City of New York Computing Research Association Consortium for Ocean Leadership Consortium of Social Science Associations Controlled Release Society Council of Graduate Schools Council on Social Work Education Crop Science Society of America Duke University Earthquake Engineering Research Institute Eating Disorders Research Society Ecological Society of America Entomological Society of America Executive Committee of the American Society of Criminology Federation of Associations in Behavioral and Brain Sciences Federation of American Societies for Experimental Biology Forensic Specialties Accreditation Board Foundation for Science and Disability Geological Society of America Genetics Society of America Harvard University Human Factors and Ergonomics Society Institute for Advanced Study Institute of Food Technologists International Association for Dental Research International Society for Computational Biology International Society for Stem Cell Research Johns Hopkins University Law and Society Association Linguistic Society of America Massachusetts Institute of Technology Materials Research Society Mathematical Association of America Michigan State University Microscopy Society of America Midwest Political Science Association National Association of Biology Teachers National Communication Association National Organization of Gay &amp; Lesbian Scientists &amp; Technical Professionals (NOGLSTP) National Postdoctoral Association Natural Science Collections Alliance National Science Teachers Association New York University North American Vascular Biology Organization Northeastern University Oklahoma Academy of Science Organization for the Study of Sex Differences Ornithological Council Paleontological Society Population Association of America Princeton University Research!America Rice University Rutgers, The State University of New Jersey Seismological Society of America Society for Adolescent Health and Medicine Society for American Archaeology Society for Behavioral Neuroendocrinology Society for Computers in Psychology Society for Conservation Biology North America Society for Developmental Biology Society for Ecological Restoration Society for Economic Botany Society of Experimental Social Psychology Society of General Internal Medicine Society for Industrial and Applied Mathematics Society for Industrial and Organizational Psychology Society for Mathematical Psychology Society of Multivariate Experimental Psychology Society for the Neural Control of Movement Society for Neuroscience Society of Nuclear Medicine and Molecular Imaging Society for Personality and Social Psychology Society for the Psychological Study of Social Issues Society for Social Studies of Science Society for Social Work and Research Society for the Study of Evolution Society for the Study of Reproduction Society of Systematic Biologists Society for Text and Discourse Society of Toxicology Soil Science Society of America Stanford University Stony Brook University The American Phytopathological Society The Gerontological Society of America The Endocrine Society The Michael J. Fox Foundation The Optical Society The Psychonomic Society United States Pharmacopeial Convention University of California System University of Cincinnati University of Iowa University of Michigan University of Pennsylvania Vanderbilt University Vision Sciences Society Washington University in St. Louis Yale University</p>
ID: 153893
Uid: 4699
Author: 4
Category: 0
Title: The Most Patriotic Act of Treason in American History?
Source: The Daily Beast
Body: <p>It sounds more Hollywood than history. A paranoid president, unhinged, drinking heavily, ranting against his enemies, terrifies subordinates. The defense secretary commits what may be the most patriotic act of treason in American history: ordering the Joint Chiefs of Staff to ignore any White House military initiatives lacking his signature.</p><p>Most historians believe that as Richard Nixon staggered toward resignation in 1974, Secretary of Defense James R. Schlesinger undermined the president’s constitutional authority. The late Watergate expert Stanley Kutler was skeptical, asking where was the paper trail? But who would write down such orders? It is more believable that this prickly, patriotic, public servant risked his career to save America rather than risking his reputation by inventing such a crazy story.</p><p>Born to an immigrant Jewish family in New York in 1929, refined with a Harvard trifecta—A.B., A.M., and Ph.D.—in the 1950s, Schlesinger was one of the meritocratic Bureaucratic Braniacs who succeeded the WASPy, aristocratic, Cold-War-era “<a href="https://www.amazon.com/dp/B00768DB2S/ref=dp-kindle-redirect?_encoding=UTF8&amp;btkr=1">Wise Men</a>.” Schlesinger converted to Lutheranism in his twenties. His Harvard classmate and Washington rival, Henry Kissinger, was a Jewish refugee who barely escaped Nazi Germany. Kissinger sniffed that Schlesinger was a rare intellectual “equal"...</p><p><a href="http://www.thedailybeast.com/articles/2017/02/11/the-most-patriotic-act-of-treason-in-american-history.html">Read the whole article on The Daily Beast.</a></p>
ID: 153894
Uid: 14552
Author: 13
Category: 0
Title: Life during Wartime - The Toch Bros. Meet President Heffalump, Part 3
Source:
Body: <img src="http://www.joshbrownnyc.com/images/ldw470.jpg">
ID: 153895
Uid: 31615
Author: 19
Category: 0
Title: Capitalism + Bauhaus = Ikea
Source:
Body: <p class="MsoNormal"><span style="font-size:12.0pt">A visit to Ikea to buy a few household items and on another day to the Bauhaus Museum opened my eyes to another irony of modern history.</span></p> <p class="MsoNormal"><span style="font-size:12.0pt">&nbsp;</span></p> <p class="MsoNormal"><span style="font-size:12.0pt">Ikea is the </span><a href="https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/IKEA"><span style="font-size:12.0pt">largest furniture retailer</span></a><span style="font-size:12.0pt"> in the world. It was founded in 1943 by the young Swede Ingvar Kamprad, who named his mail-order company after himself and his family farm. Fifteen years later he opened the first Ikea store. Last year, nearly 400 mostly gigantic stores in 48 countries sold about $40 billion worth of goods. Ikea is one of largest consumers of commercial wood products in the world.</span></p> <p class="MsoNormal"><span style="font-size:12.0pt">&nbsp;</span></p> <p class="MsoNormal"><span style="font-size:12.0pt">Ikea has been so successful partly because of Kamprad’s use of the techniques of capitalism. Ikea stores are laid out as labyrinths: once you enter, it is nearly impossible not to wind your way along a predetermined path through countless rooms selling furniture and products for every part of a house. Prices are remarkably low, because the products are standardized and simply constructed. They are made in a few giant factories scattered around the world, shipped in pieces in cleverly arranged flat packages, and sold unassembled with clear instruction booklets and a few necessary tools. In big cities in Europe and America, Ikea products can be found in countless apartments.</span></p> <p class="MsoNormal"><span style="font-size:12.0pt">&nbsp;</span></p> <p class="MsoNormal"><span style="font-size:12.0pt">Ikea has been a world leader in promoting non-traditional family structures. A </span><a href="https://web.archive.org/web/20090926070118/http:/www.commercialcloset.org/common/adlibrary/adlibrarydetails.cfm?clientID=11064&amp;QID=76"><span style="font-size:12.0pt">1994 ad</span></a><span style="font-size:12.0pt"> featured two men shopping for a dining room table, probably the first TV ad in the US with openly gay characters. It was shown only a few times, before conservatives tried to organize boycotts and threatened to bomb Ikea stores. The company has continued to feature non-traditional families in ads and catalogs around the world.</span></p> <p class="MsoNormal"><span style="font-size:12.0pt">&nbsp;</span></p> <p class="MsoNormal"><span style="font-size:12.0pt">Like many other global concerns, Ikea uses international differences in tax structures to minimize taxes. The stores are owned by a supposedly non-profit foundation seated in Luxembourg and Liechtenstein. Various European organizations have criticized Ikea for its </span><a href="http://fortune.com/2016/02/12/ikea-tax-avoidance/"><span style="font-size:12.0pt">tax avoidance policies</span></a><span style="font-size:12.0pt">. Ikea is a capitalist success story. Kamprad is one of the richest people in the world.</span></p> <p class="MsoNormal"><span style="font-size:12.0pt">&nbsp;</span></p> <p class="MsoNormal"><span style="font-size:12.0pt">Although Ikea promotional materials like to discuss “the Ikea concept”, the idea of mass-produced, affordable, functional products for everyday use was conceived after the First World War by leftist radicals who rejected conventional ideas about art. In Germany and Russia, revolutionary artists and architects attempted to combine fine arts with practical crafts to produce beautiful and functional products using modern technology and industrial materials. Schools of modern design were founded to develop and teach innovative design techniques to improve the daily lives of average people: </span><a href="https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Bauhaus"><span style="font-size:12.0pt">Bauhaus</span></a><span style="font-size:12.0pt"> (loosely, “House of Construction”) in 1919 in Weimar, Germany, and </span><a href="https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Vkhutemas"><span style="font-size:12.0pt">Vkhutemas</span></a><span style="font-size:12.0pt"> (acronym for "Higher Art and Technical Studios") in 1920 in Moscow.</span></p> <p class="MsoNormal"><span style="font-size:12.0pt">&nbsp;</span></p> <p class="MsoNormal"><span style="font-size:12.0pt">These schools and their staff shared radical political and aesthetic ideas. Their founders were socialists and communists, who focused their energies on improving working-class life by </span><a href="https://www.smashingmagazine.com/2009/08/bauhaus-ninety-years-of-inspiration/"><span style="font-size:12.0pt">developing well-designed and affordable objects</span></a><span style="font-size:12.0pt">. They rejected the conventional separation between high art for the elite and lowly craft skills, eagerly incorporated new industrial materials like steel tubing into furniture-making, and favored simple geometric constructions. They dreamed of the integration of art and life. This revolutionary aesthetic pleased angered political leaders of the far left and far right. Vkhutemas was closed by Stalin in 1930, and the Bauhaus was raided a few months after Hitler came to power in 1933. The political project of a better life for workers through design was killed by authoritarian governments.</span></p> <p class="MsoNormal"><span style="font-size:12.0pt">&nbsp;</span></p> <p class="MsoNormal"><span style="font-size:12.0pt">But the Bauhaus concept has been successfully revived by in capitalist nations by capitalist entrepreneurs. Undecorated, geometrically simple, functional yet colorful creations in our modern lives have their origin in these radical artistic projects. Stackable chairs with metal skeletons were pioneered at the Bauhaus.</span></p> <p class="MsoNormal"><span style="font-size:12.0pt">&nbsp;</span></p> <p class="MsoNormal"><span style="font-size:12.0pt">Former Bauhaus teachers like </span><a href="https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Ludwig_Mies_van_der_Rohe#American_work"><span style="font-size:12.0pt">Mies van der Rohe</span></a><span style="font-size: 12.0pt"> helped create the rectangular skyscrapers of Chicago and founded the </span><a href="https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/IIT_Institute_of_Design"><span style="font-size:12.0pt">Chicago School of Design</span></a><span style="font-size:12.0pt">, which became the Illinois Institute of Technology. The flat painted cabinet doors of Ikea kitchens look just like the 1920s kitchen displayed at the Bauhaus Museum.</span></p> <p class="MsoNormal"><span style="font-size:12.0pt">&nbsp;</span></p> <p class="MsoNormal"><span style="font-size:12.0pt">Seeking general lessons in history is a dangerous project, but also a tempting one. The failure and success of the Bauhaus idea might demonstrate that the radical leftists of the early 20<sup>th</sup> century produced some wonderful ideas for improving daily life, but that their social implementation needed capitalist economic structures. Perhaps in our world, the needs of the majority can only be met if someone becomes a billionaire.</span></p> <p class="MsoNormal"><span style="font-size:12.0pt">&nbsp;</span></p> <p class="MsoNormal"><span style="font-size:12.0pt">Steve Hochstadt</span></p> <p class="MsoNormal"><span style="font-size:12.0pt">Berlin</span></p> <p class="MsoNormal"><span style="font-size:12.0pt">Published in the Jacksonville Journal-Courier, February 14, 2017</span></p> <!--[if gte mso 9]><xml> <w:WordDocument> <w:View>Normal</w:View> <w:Zoom>0</w:Zoom> <w:TrackMoves/> <w:TrackFormatting/> <w:PunctuationKerning/> <w:ValidateAgainstSchemas/> <w:SaveIfXMLInvalid>false</w:SaveIfXMLInvalid> <w:IgnoreMixedContent>false</w:IgnoreMixedContent> <w:AlwaysShowPlaceholderText>false</w:AlwaysShowPlaceholderText> <w:DoNotPromoteQF/> <w:LidThemeOther>EN-US</w:LidThemeOther> <w:LidThemeAsian>X-NONE</w:LidThemeAsian> <w:LidThemeComplexScript>X-NONE</w:LidThemeComplexScript> <w:Compatibility> <w:BreakWrappedTables/> 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ID: 153896
Uid: 78565
Author: 38
Category: 0
Title: Russiagate
Source:
Body: <p style="text-align: center;"><img src=" /sites/default/files/153896-trump.png "></p><div style="text-align: center;">Illustration by <a href="http://www.wesdotcom.com/">Wes Jenkins</a></div><p style="text-align: center;"><br></p><p><i><a href="http://www.rickshenkman.com/">Rick Shenkman</a></i><i>&nbsp;is the editor of the History News Network and the author of&nbsp;</i><a href="http://stoneagebrain.com/"><i>Political Animals:&nbsp;&nbsp;How Our Stone-Age Brain Gets in the Way of Smart Politics</i></a><i>&nbsp;(Basic Books, 2016). You can follow him on</i> <a href="https://twitter.com/rickshenkman"><i>Twitter</i></a><i>. He blogs at</i> <a href="http://historynewsnetwork.org/blog/author/38"><i>stoneagebrain</i></a><i>.</i></p><p>Donald Trump lies repeatedly to the public like no one else ever has. &nbsp;But Michael Flynn lies once to Mike Pence and he's out on his ear?&nbsp;</p><p>This seems like a paradox. &nbsp;It isn't. &nbsp;Here's why.</p><p>&nbsp;<a href="http://stoneagebrain.com "><img src="/sites/default/files/160130-PA-shenkman-sm.png" "="" style="float:left;margin:15px;"></a> The shocking events of the last 24 hours that culminated in the resignation of the National Security Advisor demonstrate a truth that first dawned on me 20 years ago when I was writing my book, Presidential Ambition. &nbsp;It's this.</p><p>Presidents can lie freely to the American public with few consequences so long as they are liked and events are going their way. &nbsp;But they rarely if ever lie to other politicians. &nbsp;The consequences of lying to people with whom you have to work are too high in most cases.</p><p>The only example I have seen in the last generation of a president telling a big fat lie to other politicians was Bill Clinton during the Monica Lewinsky scandal. The lie worked. &nbsp;It helped keep his cabinet with him during the early months of the scandal. &nbsp;By the time they learned the truth the issue was no longer whether he'd had an affair but whether Democrats were going to stand with him in a fight with the GOP. &nbsp;As the polls were with Clinton that was an easy call.</p><p>Then there’s Trump. &nbsp;He happens to be someone who lies both to the public and to the people around him. In this respect he's truly different from representatives of the political class. &nbsp;Until now he's managed to succeed despite this moral deficiency.</p><p>But in another way he's just like normal politicians. &nbsp;It's apparent he often doesn't seem to recognize the difference between the truth and a lie. This is common among politicians. &nbsp;It's the main way they get away with lying.</p><p>As humans we have two main defenses against a liar. &nbsp;One is that liars get a reputation for lying. &nbsp;Once they do we are on our guard when they open their mouth and speak. &nbsp;But this chiefly works in the sphere of life in which we operate day to day. &nbsp;In the political realm a reputation for lying can often easily be dismissed as the creation of partisan enemies.</p><p>The other defense we have against a liar is that liars normally give themselves away. &nbsp;They twitch or blink or look away or do something that suggests insincerity. &nbsp;Our human cheater detection system goes into overdrive when we detect insincerity. &nbsp;This protects us from cheaters.</p><p>But do you see the problem? &nbsp;A really good liar can defeat our cheater detection system if they can lie without appearing nervous. &nbsp;They do this by convincing themselves in the moment they are lying that they are not lying. &nbsp;LBJ was said to be good at this. &nbsp;(See Robert Caro’s LBJ biography, volumes 1 through 4.)</p><p>Trump seems to have this facility. &nbsp;He doesn’t give away himself when he’s lying. &nbsp;He sounds the same no matter what he’s saying. &nbsp;To his believers he’s a truth teller.</p><p>The Flynn incident should serve as a lesson in morality for Mr. Trump. It should teach him that the consequences of prevarication are steep. &nbsp;It won’t. &nbsp;So you can expect Mr. Trump to keep lying.</p><p>This is sad.</p><br><br><br>