Liberty and Power

first 330 331 332 333 334 335 336 337 338 last


  • ANARCHY IS ORDER

    by Roderick T. Long

    I've been having a running online debate over anarchism with Robert Bidinotto; he maintains that the rule of law depends on the existence of a"final arbiter" in society, whereas I maintain that the rule of law not only does not require, but is actually incompatible with, such a final arbiter. For those who are interested, here are the relevant links:

    Bidinotto's original article:

  • THE LORD OF THE CA-CHINGS

    by Franklin Harris

    Director Peter Jackson's"The Lord of the Rings" trilogy has put New Zealand on the moviemaking map, resulting in millions of dollars being pumped into the Kiwi economy, with Jackson still set to film his"King Kong" remake there. But the obvious economic benefit to the country isn't enough for one of the nation's politicians, who still complains about the size of tax breaks New Zealand gives filmmakers. And Deputy Prime Minister

  • CROCODILE HUNTER OR THE HUNTED?

    by Franklin Harris

    First of all, let me thank David Beito for the invitation to be a guest blogger here at Liberty and Power. If you read my blog (linked at right), you already know that I spend most of my time writing about popular culture. So, for the next week, I'll probably confine my observations to that murky realm where politics and culture meet, marry and have a long and bitter divorce. Think of politics as an abusive spouse.

    Fortunately, the morning news was kind to me. It seems that Steve"Crocodile


  • ANGELS IN AMERICA: A HYMN TO LIFE

    by Arthur Silber

    I hope that Part IIA of my discussion about Angels in America provided enough details to give a sense of what the experience of watching the film is like -- and to give an indication of the variety and complexity of themes that run through it.

    Kushner's thematic material is endlessly rich and provocative. At the beginning of the second half of Angels, the Angel who has appeared to Prior Walter transmits


  • SOME INITIAL REFLECTIONS ON LIBERTY AND POWER

    by William Marina

    David Beito’s invitation to join the Liberty and Power project Blog has offered me once again the opportunity to reflect upon these two concepts, and to clarify in my own mind the fundamental issues which face us today both as Americans and as historians.

    Consider, for example, Lord Acton’s oft repeated quote, “Power corrupts, and absolute power corrupts, absolutely.” What is the difference between the two; power and absolute power? And how do either of those rela


  • Happy '04!

    by Wendy McElroy

    HAPPY NEW YEAR!!! to one and all. I have a good feeling about '04. Hooray to Dave Barry's 'year in review' column! Barry advises,"2003 is finally, we hope, over. But before we move on, let's put our heads between our knees and take one last look back at this remarkable year." For more sobering commentary, try David Martin's

  • THE UNTHINKABLE, THANKS, GOODBYE, AND HAPPY NEW YEAR

    by Sam Koritz

    Some things are literally unthinkable. For example, Frederick W. Kagan's,"The art of war," an article in the November 2003 issue of The New Criterion, presents compelling evidence that attempting to dominate the world militarily will fail and lead to national ruin, yet Kagan, a teacher of military history at West Point, advocates just such a policy, and apparently sees no need to defend this choice. Excerpts follow:


  • NEW AND IMPROVED LIBERTY AND POWER

    by David T. Beito

    As you can see, our software has been modernized. The biggest change for readers is that each blog now includes a comment section. They can also finally have a real hope that the permalinks will actually work! Hopefully, Rick Shenkman and the folks at the History News Network can now have a respite from our pesky and and frantic questions about technical glitches which were legion under the old software. All hail HNN!

  • ECONOMICS EDUCATION MALPRACTICE

    by King Banaian

    You want to see what we're up against? Joanne Jacobs links to an article by Neil Boortz on how bad some economic education really can be.The children sit in a circle. Some are wearing mittens; others are waiting expectantly with little plastic shovels. The rules of the game state that a few of the children must do nothing but sit and watch as

  • MIXED ECONOMY 101

    by Chris Matthew Sciabarra

    The NY Times tells us that James Baker's call to service in Iraq is all well and good, but that he"is far too tangled in a matrix of lucrative private business relationships that leave him looking like a potentially interested party in any debt-restructuring formula. The obvious solution is for him to sever his ties to all firms doing work directly or indirectly related to Iraq." The editorial continues:

    Mr.

first 330 331 332 333 334 335 336 337 338 last