Blogs > HNN > Midterm Elections 2010: Results & Reactions, Roundup; Republican Sweep

Nov 7, 2010 10:13 pm

Midterm Elections 2010: Results & Reactions, Roundup; Republican Sweep

Midterm Elections




    2010 Election: Live results (USA Today):

    U.S. House RESULTS: D 187 - R 239
    CURRENT: D 256 - R 179

    U.S. Senate RESULTS: D 53 R 46 CURRENT: D 57 - R 41

    Governor RESULTS: D 17 - R 29 I - 3
    CURRENT: D 26 - R 24

    Washington Post:
    Senate: D 53 - R 46
    House: D 186 - R 239
    Governor: D 18 - R 29 - I 1

    NYT: House Map
    Senate Map

    HNN Hot Topics: Midterm Elections

  • Live Blogging Election Night - NYT, The Caucus, 11-2-10
  • Midterm elections live blog 2010 - Yahoo News, 11-2-10
  • Steny Hoyer mulls bid for minority whip
  • Nancy Pelosi announces she will run for minority leader: Speaker Nancy Pelosi (Calif.) has tweeted that she will run to lead Democrats in the House of Representatives.
  • Unemployment rate holds at 9.6 percent: The U.S. economy added 151,000 jobs in October, as the unemployment rate held at 9.6 percent.
  • A.P. Projects Democrat Patty Murray Will Hold Washington Senate Seat: The Associated Press is projecting that Senator Patty Murray, a powerful member of the Democratic leadership, will defeat her Republican opponent, Dino Rossi, in Washington State.
  • Democrat Wins Illinois Governor Race: Gov. Patrick J. Quinn was declared the winner of the race for governor of Illinois by The Associated Press this afternoon.... - NYT, 11-4-10
  • In Connecticut, Two Men Prepare to Be Governor: Thursday was the first full day of work for the transition team of Dannel P. Malloy, the Democrat who was certain he was the winner in the race for governor of Connecticut. Dannel P. Malloy, the former Democratic mayor of Stamford, was declared the unofficial winner. It was also the first full day of work for the transition team of Thomas C. Foley, the Republican who was equally sure he was the victor. Clearly, one of these men was going to be terribly disappointed. But when and how was still, well, unclear.... - NYT, 11-4-10
  • Oregon: Democrat wins historic 3rd term as governor: Democrat John Kitzhaber and Republican Chris Dudley are locked in a tight race for governor in Oregon after a big- spending campaign that... AP, 11-4-10
  • Murkowski acts like victor but questions linger: Alaska U.S. Sen. Lisa Murkowski is acting as though she already has pulled off an improbable victory after her write-in candidacy, enthusiastically thanking supporters and telling them they've made history. She may have won. Or she may be overly optimistic. The race is far from over.... - wApO, 11-4-10
  • In state capitols, GOP engineers historic shift: Republicans scored huge and historic successes in state legislative elections Tuesday, exceeding even the great performance the party had in congressional races. GOP candidates picked up about 650 Democratic-held seats, the most in nearly half a century. Republicans now control more legislative seats than at any time since 1928.
    "To describe this as a Republican wave would be a vast understatement," says elections expert Tim Storey of the National Conference of State Legislatures."They won in places where we didn't see it coming, and they won in places where we did see it coming," he says. The shift will have a big effect on spending, taxes, public education and how political districts are drawn.... - USA TODAY, 11-4-10
  • Revolution in the States The GOP also made history down ballot on Tuesday: Here's a prediction: Democrats and liberals will soon preach the virtues of Congressional redistricting reform. The reason is the historic losses Democrats suffered on Tuesday at the state level that have set Republicans up to dominate the post-2000 Census process of rewriting district lines.
    The GOP's failure to take over the U.S. Senate has masked the arguably more important story that Republicans picked up at least a record 680 state legislative seats nationwide. That's more than even the 472 seat gain in 1994, according to the American Legislative Exchange Council, and more than the previous record of 628 seats by ... - WSJ, 11-4-10
  • Poll: GOP candidates top Obama in hypothetical 2012 race: President Obama trails some top GOP contenders in a hypothetical 2012 matchup.
    Former Arkansas Gov. Mike Huckabee is the favorite for the GOP 2012 presidential nomination
    Former Massachusetts Gov. Mitt Romney is a close second
    Nearly three-quarters of Democrats say they want to see the party renominate Barack Obama in 2012... - CNN, 11-4-10
  • Poll: Obama Would Beat Palin in 2012: The midterm elections are so yesterday. The eyes of many political insiders are already turning to 2012. President Obama would handily beat Sarah Palin in the next presidential election, despite strong anti-incumbent feelings and the Democrats losing the House to the GOP this week, a new CNN/Opinion Research Corp. poll indicates.
    And while Obama would win against the Tea Party favorite, 52% to 44% among registered voters, pit the President against Mike Huckabee and it's an entirely different story.
    The former Arkansas Governor and 2008 GOP White House candidate would beat Obama 52% to 44% in a hypothetical matchup, the survey reveals.
    While there's no clear GOP frontrunner, 21% Republicans said they're most likely to back Huckabee, 20% said they'd support former Massachusetts Gov. Mitt Romney, 14% said they'd back Palin and 12% were for ex-House Speaker Newt Gingrich.
    Romney would also beat Obama 50 % to 45%, but Obama would beat Gingrich 49% to 47%.... - US News, 11-4-10
  • Sarah Palin's 'Take Back the 20' PAC scores a bull's-eye: During the 2010 midterm elections, Sarah Palin went hunting for Democrats and nearly bagged her limit."Take Back the 20," Palin's political action committee, targeted 20 congressional districts across the country that John McCain carried in 2008 but had Democratic representatives in Congress.
    The results are eye-opening. Palin succeeded in 18 of 20 districts, losing in West Virginia's 3rd House District. At this time, the race in Arizona's 8th House District is too close to call.
    The 18 Republican winners unseated freshman politicians, congressional veterans and even House Budget Committee Chairman John Spratt.... - AP, 11-4-10
  • Religion's role in the November 2010 election: It may surprise some, but here are two typical pre-election statements made at churches and synagogues. From first-hand experience interviewing people in America's two largest religions -- Christianity and Judaism -- about 50 percent of Bible and Torah believers often don't let their faith influence their voting. It's more about party affiliation and the economy.... - Yahoo News, 11-4-10
  • Parsing the Myths of the Midterm Election: Every election develops its own mythology, usually before the official results are even certified, and this week’s was no different. And like all mythology, the narrative that is being woven around the midterm elections by Bulfinches from both parties is a blend of history, facts and, yes, myths. Before it hardens into accepted fact, some of the new conventional wisdom might benefit from one more spin on the potter's wheel: The Mandate Myth
    The Return to the Republican Fold
    The Lost Youth Vote
    Disaster for the President
    Mythmakers, or Debunkers, Know What They’re Talking About - NYT, 11-5-10
  • Snapshot: Election night at Fox News: After all the drumming for conservative candidates, you'd think the network's talking heads would be crowing over Republican gains. But things were surprisingly subdued.... - LAT, 11-7-10
  • GOP regains control of House in historic elections: Republicans have seized control of the House for the first time since 2006, riding a wave of voter discontent and economic woes to directly challenge President Barack Obama's agenda.
    House Republicans have captured 220 seats and were leading in 20 other races. Only 218 seats are needed for control of the House.
    Republicans have picked up a net gain of 53 seats and were leading for another 13 Democratic-held seats. If current trend holds, Republicans could record their largest gains in the House in more than 70 years.
    In 1938, the party gained 80 seats during the second term of President Franklin Delano Roosevelt.... - AP, 11-3-10
  • Republicans Will Take Control of the House: John A. Boehner, the House Republican leader, in an emotional moment during a victory gathering for the National Republican Congressional Committee in Washington. More Photos »
    Republicans captured control of the House of Representatives on Tuesday and expanded their voice in the Senate, riding a wave of voter discontent as they dealt a setback to President Obama just two years after his triumphal victory.
    A Republican resurgence, propelled by deep economic worries and a forceful opposition to the Democratic agenda of health care and government spending, delivered defeats to Democrats from the Northeast to the South and across the Midwest. The tide swept aside dozens of Democratic lawmakers, regardless of their seniority or their voting records, upending the balance of power for the second half of Mr. Obama’s term.... -
  • Republicans Will Win Control of House: The New York Times is projecting that Republicans will win the 218 seats necessary for control of the House of Representatives after four years of Democratic control of the chamber.
  • Democrats keep control of the U.S. Senate: Democrats retain enough seats to hold on to the U.S. Senate, The Washington Post projects.
  • As CNN, ABC, MSNBC and other networks are now projecting, though, even if the Democrats lose all 4 of those races, they will still have 50 seats. According to Senate rules, the Vice President breaks a tie, which means Democrats will keep control.
  • GOP to grab U.S. House majority; Democrats poised to retain Senate: Republicans rode a wave of voter dissatisfaction with the state of the economy to win majority control of the U.S. House of Representatives in Tuesday's midterm elections, while Democrats were poised to retain their majority in the Senate. With results still coming in and voting continuing in Western states, the extent of the Republican takeover of the 435-member House was still to be determined. But CNN projected that Republicans would win at least 52 more House seats than they currently hold to wipe out the Democratic majority of the past four years.... - CNN, 11-2-10
  • 2010 election results: media coverage in portions for every appetite: Coverage of the 2010 election results will be provided in more ways than ever before – from centuries-old delivery methods like newspapers to ABC News's iPad application.... - CS Monitor, 11-2-10
  • Exit poll: Economy dominates voters' worries: Voters were intensely worried about the future of the economy Tuesday and unhappy with the way President Barack Obama and Congress have been running things. They didn't hold a favorable view of either the Republican or Democratic parties, according to an Associated Press analysis of preliminary exit poll results and pre-election polls. Overwhelmingly, people at the polls were dissatisfied with the way the federal government is working, and a fourth said they're angry about it.... - AP, 11-2-10


John Boehner

  • Republicans in charge take aim at health overhaul: Resurgent Republicans rallied Sunday behind an agenda based on unwavering opposition to the Obama White House and federal spending, laying the groundwork for gridlock until their 2012 goal: a new president, a"better Senate" and ridding the country of that demonized health care law. Republicans said they were willing to work with President Barack Obama but also signaled it would be only on their terms. With control of the White House and the Senate, Democrats showed no sign they were conceding the final two years of Obama's term to Republican lawmakers who claimed the majority in the House.
    Voters on Tuesday punished Democrats from New Hampshire to California, giving Republicans at least 60 new seats in the House. Republicans picked up 10 governorships; the GOP also gained control of 19 state legislative chambers and now holds the highest level of state legislative seats since 1928.... - AP, 11-7-10
  • 'Obama Comes Across as Cold, Arrogant and Elitist': Tea Party Activists display a US Flag in front of the Capitol Building in Washington. It was a failure of historic proportions. With US President Barack Obama's Democrats having lost control of the House, there seems little hope for progress during his two remaining years, say German commentators. Obama himself, they say, bears much of the blame. On Tuesday, US President Barack Obama and his Democratic party were issued a stinging defeat in the mid-term elections as the Republicans gained control of the House of Representatives and installed themselves in 22 governor's mansions. Though the Democrats narrowly were able to keep control of the Senate, the Republicans, who rode the wave of anti- incumbent sentiment and populist anger over the economy into office, now have the power to determine the House's legislative agenda -- and to block Obama proposals. Indeed, Republican leaders in the House have already promised that their first order of business will be to repeal Obama's health care reform -- his signature achievement.... - Spiegal, 11-4-10
  • Republican establishment takes on Sarah Palin: Senior officials from former president Bush on down say she's not ready for the presidency, and some are questioning her recent decisions and pronouncements.... - Cs Monirtor, 11-6-10
  • G.O.P. Plans to Use Purse Strings to Fight Health Law: As they seek to make good on their campaign promise to roll back President Obama’s health care overhaul, the incoming Republican leaders in the House say they intend to use their new muscle to cut off money for the law, setting up a series of partisan clashes and testing Democratic commitment to the legislation.... - NYT, 11-7-10
  • How Pelosi's determination could hamper Obama: Just when President Obama thought he had all the problems he could handle, House Speaker Nancy Pelosi might have handed him another. Pelosi stunned many Democrats on Friday with the announcement that she will run for leader of the new Democratic minority in the House. If her colleagues and the smart money in Washington thought she would retreat and resign after the Democrats' 60-seat loss Tuesday, Pelosi reminded them that she didn't become the first female speaker in history through timidity. The question is whether she has significantly complicated life for Obama as he prepares to deal with the Republican majority in the House and Senate Republicans led by someone who spent the week hurling thunderbolts at 1600 Pennsylvania Ave. From outside reports, the White House was conflicted about whether it wanted her to stay or go, torn between loyalty to the speaker for all she did during the past two years and its own political needs in the wake of Tuesday's loss.... - WaPo, 11-6-10
  • GOP deciding which direction to go with new authority after midterm victory: Jubilant over their landslide victory in the House and their pickup of six Senate seats, Republican leaders nevertheless face a dilemma as they debate how to exert their new authority. Their energetic conservative base is eager to thwart President Obama's every move, and if Republicans fail at doing so, they risk disappointing the supporters who turned out in vast numbers for Tuesday's midterm elections. But if Republicans overreach, and ultimately deliver very little, independents could return to the Democratic fold in time to reelect Obama.... - WaPo, 11-4-10
  • Jim DeMint basks in election afterglow, but did he cost GOP the Senate?: Even as Sen. Jim DeMint emerges from the elections with widespread recognition as leader of a resurgent conservative force in Congress, he faces criticism that the millions he spent on hard-right candidates cost Republicans control of the Senate.
    Five DeMint-backed candidates were elected to the Senate, but five were defeated — with a sixth, Joe Miller of Alaska, trailing incumbent GOP Sen. Lisa Murkowski in her historic write-in bid as an independent to keep her seat.... - Boston Herald, 11-6-10
  • Are GOP leaders going too far with their criticism of Obama?: The president certainly has been getting it from GOP leaders the past few days. But the real question regarding Obama, the Republicans say, is: 'Is he getting it?'.... - CS Monitor, 11-5-10
  • Obama Says Jobs Report Is Encouraging for Recovery: President Barack Obama said today’s employment report is a sign that the economy is recovering from the"terrible damage" caused by the worst recession since the Great Depression. Still, recent increases in private sector employment are"not good enough," Obama said at the White House."The unemployment rate is still unacceptably high." Obama spoke before leaving for a 10-day trip through Asia that is focused on trade and expanding U.S. exports. In remarks directed at Congress, he said the U.S. can't afford to get"mired" in partisan battles over policy while countries such as China move forward to expand their economies.... - Bloomberg, 11-5-10
  • Obama admits failing to sell successes to Americans: US President Barack Obama acknowledged he had failed to persuade Americans of his administration's successes, following an election hammering which saw his party lose control of the House of Representatives.
    "We were so busy and so focused on getting a bunch of stuff done that we stopped paying attention to the fact that leadership isn't just legislation, that it's a matter of persuading people," Obama told CBS show"60 Minutes" in excerpts released Friday."We haven't always been successful at that," the president added."I take personal responsibility for that, and it's something that I've got to examine carefully as I go forward."... - AFP, 11-5-10
  • It's Reaction Day, which is like Election Day but lazier: The New York Post:"HUMBLED" reads the main hed;"My fault, pres says day after Dems lose 61 seats in House." The picture is worth a few more words: eyes downturned and closed, his mouth in a pout that gathers more flesh under his lower lip than you probably thought he had on his whole head.
    Daily News:"WOE BAMA!" is the News' slightly less serious wood for the Obama shellacking story, advertising four pages of coverage of Reaction Day. It's a similar, but more close-cropped pouty Obama we get here. But it's time to move on, right?... - Capital New York, 11-4-10
  • GOP asserts new strength, targets Obama programs: Victorious at the polls, congressional Republicans asserted their newfound political strength on Thursday, vowing to seek a quick $100 billion in federal spending cuts and force repeated votes on the repeal of President Barack Obama's prized health care overhaul.
    At the White Houses, Obama said his administration was ready to work across party lines in a fresh attempt to"focus on the economy and jobs" as well as attack waste in government. In a show of bipartisanship, he invited top lawmakers to the White House at mid-month, and the nation's newly elected governors two weeks later.... - AP, 11-4-10
  • US president Barack Obama's torment at election 'shellacking': President Barack Obama's rivals did cartwheels of jubilation yesterday after seizing control of the US Congress. Victorious congressman Ed Perlmutter's extravagant acrobatics marked the Republicans' biggest win in the mid-term elections since the Great Depression of 1938. But their capture of the House of Representatives left American politics in paralysis last night as the right-wingers looked set to hamper a major economic stimulus plan by Obama's Democrats.
    In a White House press conference yesterday, the humbled President sighed:"I am not recommending for every future president that they take a shellacking like I did last night. I am sure there are easier ways to learn these lessons."It feels bad. It's hard. I take responsibility. I've got to do a better job." The man who swept to the White House two years ago conceded:"Some election nights are more fun than others."... - Mirror UK, 11-4-10
  • Election doesn't end major discord for GOP, Obama: Barely an hour after President Barack Obama invited congressional Republicans to post-election talks on Nov. 18 to work together on major issues, the Senate's GOP leader had a blunt message: His party's main goal is denying Obama re-election.
    "The only way to do all these things it is to put someone in the White House who won't veto any of these things," Sen. Mitch McConnell said in a speech to the conservative Heritage Foundation.
    "I want us to talk substantively about how we can move the American people's agenda forward," Obama said of the upcoming meeting with lawmakers."It's not just going to be a photo op."... - AP, 11-4-10
  • Democrats Outrun by a 2-Year G.O.P. Comeback Plan: "If the goal of the majority is to govern, what is the purpose of the minority?" one slide asked."The purpose of the minority," came the answer,"is to become the majority." The presentation was the product of a strategy session held 11 days before Mr. Obama’s inauguration, when top Republican leaders in the House of Representatives began devising an early blueprint for what they would accomplish in Tuesday’s election: their comeback.
    How they did it is the story of one of the most remarkable Congressional campaigns in more than a half-century, characterized by careful plotting by Republicans, miscalculations by Democrats and a new political dynamic with forces out of both parties’ control. The unpredictable Tea Party movement, the torrent of corporate money from outside interests and an electorate with deep discontent helped shift the balance of power in Washington. The White House struggled to keep Democrats in line, with a misplaced confidence in the power of the coalition that propelled Mr. Obama into office. Republicans capitalized on backlash to the ambitious agenda Mr. Obama and his party pursued, which fueled unrestricted and often anonymous contributions to conservative groups, some advised by a nemesis Democrats thought they had shaken, Karl Rove. That money so strengthened the Republican assault across the country that an exasperated Democratic party strategist likened it to"nuclear Whac-a-Mole."... - NYT, 11-4-10
  • Voters to Republicans: Don't Get Too Comfortable: The power shift may not last with Tea Partiers looking to disrupt their own leaders.... - Business Week, 11-4-10
  • Rivalry Tests Tea-Party Clout: House Republicans are embroiled in a leadership struggle just days after their sweeping electoral victory, testing how much influence tea-party passions will have on how lawmakers run the chamber. Rep. Jeb Hensarling of Texas, who raised money for many House candidates and was deeply involved in the Republicans' campaign efforts, is running for chairman of the House Republican Conference, the No. 4 position in the House GOP, with the backing of party leaders. His opponent is Minnesota Rep. Michele Bachmann, a favorite of tea-party activists who is known for her colorful statements. Some GOP leaders believe she would be less effective, but many tea-party activists see this as a test of whether Republicans are listening to them.... - WaPo, 11-4-10
  • In state capitols, GOP engineers historic shift: Republicans scored historic successes in state legislative elections Tuesday, exceeding even their performances in congressional races.... - USA Today, 11-4-10
  • Survivors' scenarios could help in 2012: Figuring out why 29 vulnerable Democrats won while others lost could help leaders of both parties as they prepare for the 2012 elections.... - USA TODAY, 11-4-10
  • Boost for Keeping All Bush Tax Cuts: President Barack Obama is open to considering the extension of all Bush-era tax cuts for a year or two, the White House confirmed Thursday, putting to a likely end any debate over whether to extend the breaks for high-income families. Instead, Congress is poised to grapple with a different set of questions when it returns this month for a final session of the current term: How and for how long should lawmakers grant an extension?.... - WSJ, 11-4-10
  • White House Pushes Back on Tax Cuts for Wealthy: While President Obama again signaled interest in finding common ground with Republicans in the wake of their electoral triumph, the White House on Thursday drew a firmer line against making permanent Bush-era tax cuts for the wealthiest Americans. Mr. Obama and Republicans agree on extending the tax cuts enacted under President George W. Bush for the vast majority of Americans, but the president has opposed making them permanent for income over $200,000 for individuals or $250,000 for households, essentially the richest 2 percent of Americans. The tax cuts expire at the end of the year.... - NYT, 11-4-10
  • Health-Care Industry Still Braces for Change: Repeal of the federal health-care overhaul was central to many Republican campaigns this season. But even with the House changing hands, health insurers, drug companies and hospitals said they were planning as if the law will stick.... - WSJ, 11-4-10
  • Palin’s Endorsements Lay Base for a 2012 Run: If Sarah Palin, the former Alaska governor, decides to run for president in 2012, she will now have plenty of help. In New Hampshire, which holds the first presidential primary in the nation, Ms. Palin can count on the support of its newly elected senator, Kelly Ayotte. When the presidential campaign moves to South Carolina, the state’s new governor, Nikki Haley, will owe her one. And out West, Susana Martinez, who will take office as New Mexico’s governor, will be ready to help during a potential general election matchup with President Obama as the two parties battle over the growing number of Hispanic voters in the Southwest. Ms. Palin was not on any ballot. But the self-described “Mama Grizzly” had plenty at stake on Tuesday night as she sought to bolster her credentials as the Republican Party’s most powerful kingmaker and the voice of the newly empowered Tea Party movement. Ms. Palin had endorsed dozens of candidates, including ones in some of the highest-profile races.... - NYT, 11-4-10
  • G.O.P Captures House, but Falls Short in Senate: "Republicans captured control of the House of Representatives on Tuesday and expanded their voice in the Senate, riding a wave of voter discontent as they dealt a setback to President Obama just two years after his triumphal victory," writes Jeff Zeleny.... - New York Times
  • Republicans capture control of House; Dems to retain Senate: "Just four years after surrendering power, Republicans recaptured control of the House and made gains in the Senate on Tuesday night, in a major rebuff of President Obama and the Democrats by an electorate worried about the economy and the size of the government," writes Dan Balz.... - Washington Post
  • GOP Wins House in Huge Swing: "Republicans won control of the House of Representatives as voters dealt a stiff rebuke to President Barack Obama and the Democratic Party in a historic wave that swept the GOP to power in states and districts across the country," write Laura Meckler and Jonathan Weisman.... - Wall Street Journal
  • Republicans win House, Democrats retain Senate: "Republicans, tapping into widespread anger over the ailing economy and disappointment with President Obama's leadership, wrested control of the House of Representatives from Democrats in Tuesday's midterm elections, but fell just short of winning the Senate," writes Douglas Stanglin.... - USA Today
  • Republicans promise limited government: Emboldened by a commanding House majority and Senate gains, Republican leaders vowed Wednesday to roll back the size of government and, in time, the nation's sweeping health care law. President Barack Obama, reflective after his party's drubbing, accepted blame for failing to deliver the economic security Americans demand while saying of his health overhaul:"This was the right thing to do." He called the election a"shellacking."
    After two years with fellow Democrats leading Congress, Obama now must deal for the rest of his term with the jarring reality of Republican control of the House, a diminished Democratic majority in the Senate and a new flock of lawmakers sworn to downsize government at every chance.
    The capital awoke — if it ever slept — to a new political order. With their lopsided win, Republicans are ushering in a new era of divided government and dethroning Speaker Nancy Pelosi, a prime target of their campaign.... - AP, 11-3-10
  • Obama signals compromise with GOP on tax cuts: A chastened President Barack Obama signaled a willingness to compromise with Republicans on tax cuts and energy policy Wednesday, one day after his party lost control of the House and suffered deep Senate losses in midterm elections. Obama ruefully called the Republican victories"a shellacking."
    At a White House news conference, the president said that when Congress returns,"my goal is to make sure we don't have a huge spike in taxes for middle class families." He made no mention of his campaign-long insistence that tax cuts be permitted to expire on upper-income families, a position he said would avoid swelling the deficit but put him in conflict with Republicans.
    He also virtually abandoned his legislation — hopelessly stalled in the Senate — featuring economic incentives to reduce carbon emissions from power plants, vehicles and other sources."I'm going to be looking for other means of addressing this problem," he said."Cap and trade was just one way of skinning the cat," he said, strongly implying there will be others.... - AP, 11-3-10
  • G.O.P. Leaders Vow to Repeal Health Care Law: At a news conference at the Capitol, the likely House speaker, Representative John A. Boehner, and the Senate Republican leader, Mitch McConnell of Kentucky, invited President Obama to work with them on these and other goals. But they also quickly adopted an aggressive posture on some issues certain to antagonize Democrats, including a vow to repeal the big new health care law.
    Mr. Obama, at his own news conference in the East Room of the White House, called the election results “humbling,” but he also attributed the far-reaching Republican victories largely to the public’s frustration over the slow economic recovery."What they were expressing great frustration about is that we haven’t made enough progress on the economy," he said.
    The president said he was"eager to hear good ideas wherever they come from" and expressed a willingness to work with Republicans."We must find common ground," he said,"in order to make progress on some uncommonly difficult challenges." And he cited energy and education as two policy areas on which Republicans and Democrats could see eye to eye.... - NYT, 11-3-10
  • Obama Takes Responsibility for Voter Frustration: "Some election nights are more fun than others," he told reporters in the East Room of the White House."Some are exhilarating. Some are humbling." He said that he had to take"direct responsibility" for the failure to repair the nation’s economic fortunes. But in his opening remarks and answers to early questions, Mr. Obama refused to say that the Republican wave that swept across the country was a fundamental rejection of his administration’s policies.
    "There is no doubt that people’s No. 1 concern is the economy," he said."What they were expressing great frustration about is that we haven’t made enough progress on the economy." The president repeatedly said that he wanted to work with the newly empowered Republicans in Washington. But he also said more than once that there were some principles that both parties were going to be unwilling to compromise on.... - NYT, 11-3-10
  • House leaders begin outlining priorities: Republicans on Wednesday pointed to their House takeover as a mandate to" change course" on economic policy and key elements of President Obama's agenda, including the health care overhaul he pushed through Congress this year.... - USA Today, 11-3-10
  • Pelosi Election Results: What It Mean's for Health Care Champion: Nancy Pelosi may not have been up for election Tuesday night, but many Republicans felt her ideas were, chief amongst them strong support for Obama's health care plan. Several big ticket conservatives as well as new members of Congress have pledged to roll back key pieces of Obamacare or repeal it entirely.... - CBS News, 11-3-10
  • Sarah Palin The Mama Grizzly Scorecard: She didn't appear on any ballot yet one big question of the Tuesday night election was how well did Sarah Palin do? Palin will point to a positive win-loss record—49 of her 77 candidates triumphed, (6 races had yet to be called by Wednesday morning.) But many of the highest-profile races, where she had loudly interjected herself, her candidates— Sharron Angle in Nevada, Christine O'Donnell in Delaware, and John Raese in West Virginia—lost.
    Even in her home state of Alaska, her help seems to have been less than helpful. Joe Miller, the GOP candidate and Palin protégée, ended up having to fight off the write-in candidate Lisa Murkowski, and even a last-minute bit of McMentum—when Democratic candidate, Scott McAdams suddenly seemed to rally. By late Tuesday night, that race had still not been called, but Murkowski was leading.
    If there was a silver lining for the former Alaska Governor, it came in the form of Nikki Haley in South Carolina, Susana Martinez in New Mexico, and Mary Fallin in Oklahoma—the first time women won governorships in those three states.
    The election may have been a vote on Obama and the Democrats. But for many watching, the most widely anticipated other referendum was how well Palin would do. Of her 77 candidates around the nation, 20 are women—in the Palin vernacular, her Mama Grizzlies who, she had predicted, would"rise up on their hind legs."... - The Daily Beast, 11-3-10
  • Tea party-backed Rick Scott claims Fla. governor win: Tea party-backed Republican businessman Rick Scott, who ran as an outsider vowing to shake up the political establishment, claimed victory Wednesday as Florida's next governor after Democrat Alex Sink conceded an extremely tight race.... - AP, 11-3-10
  • California Climate Law Survives Challenge at Polls: The defeat of Proposition 23 marked a big victory for Silicon Valley investors, who poured millions of dollars into defending California's AB 32 law and protecting their massive investments in green technologies ranging from solar power to electric cars. - Reuters, 11-3-10
  • Boehner wants Bush tax cuts extended for all: U.S. House of Representatives Republican leader John Boehner said on Wednesday that extending the Bush tax cuts for all income groups is the right policy.... - Reuters, 11-3-10
  • Lengthy to-do list awaits lame duck session: Now that the elections are over, a lame-duck Congress comes back to work this month to deal with a pile of unfinished business: whether to extend Bush-era tax cuts due to expire, give seniors a $250 Social Security special payment and repeal the military's"don't ask, don't tell" policy against gays serving openly. It's an open question how much they'll get done. The current Congress returns Nov. 15 for a post-election session dominated by tax and spending issues. Rarely has such a big pile of work faced lawmakers when the party in power has suffered so much at the ballot box.... - AP, 11-3-10
  • Tea time: Republicans locking up House control: Republicans marched toward House control Tuesday night in midterm elections shadowed by recession, locking up enough Democratic seats to install a conservative majority certain to challenge President Barack Obama at virtually every turn. Speaker-in-waiting John Boehner, his voice breaking with emotion, declared to fellow Republicans,"I'll never let you down.".... - AP, 11-3-10
  • GOP takes the House, but fall short in Senate: Resurgent Republicans won control of the House early Wednesday in midterm elections shadowed by recession, promising a conservative majority certain to challenge President Barack Obama at every turn. Speaker-in-waiting John Boehner called the results"a repudiation of Washington, a repudiation of big government and a repudiation of politicians who refuse to listen to the people."
    Republicans fell short in their effort to gain control of the Senate and take full command of Congress, although they picked up at least five seats. They also wrested at least eight governorships from Democrats.
    Obama telephoned Boehner shortly after midnight to congratulate him, a call that underscored the transition to divided government. - AP, 11-3-10
  • Democrats lose 6 Senate seats, but keep majority: Democrats retained their Senate majority Tuesday, losing five seats but winning key races in West Virginia and California. Republicans scored big gains, taking Senate seats from Democrats in Pennsylvania, Wisconsin, Arkansas, North Dakota and Indiana. The net gain of 10 they needed for control of the chamber, however, eluded them.
    With Republicans taking over the House, President Barack Obama will need a Democratic-run Senate to champion his legislative agenda.... - AP, 11-3-10
  • GOP captures governorships in at least 10 states: Republicans on Tuesday captured from Democrats governorships in at least 10 states, including some prime presidential battlegrounds, and hoped for even more statehouse gains. The same tide sweeping Republicans into office in Congress was leaving its mark on governors' mansions as well, especially in the nation's industrial heartland.
    Lost in the GOP onslaught: governorships now held by Democrats in Pennsylvania, Ohio, Michigan, Wisconsin, Iowa, Tennessee, Kansas, Oklahoma, New Mexico and Wyoming.... - AP, 11-3-10
  • In Republican Victories, Tide Turns Starkly: Somewhere along the way, the apostle of change became its target, engulfed by the same currents that swept him to the White House two years ago. Now, President Obama must find a way to recalibrate with nothing less than his presidency on the line.
    The verdict delivered by voters on Tuesday effectively put an end to his transformational ambitions and left him searching for a way forward with a more circumscribed horizon of possibilities. Facing a hostile House with subpoena power and a diminished majority in the Senate, he will have to figure out the right blend of conciliation and confrontation to reassert authority and avoid defeat in 2012.
    The most pressing question as Mr. Obama picks through the results on Wednesday morning will be what lessons he takes from the electoral reversals. Was this the natural and unavoidable backlash in a time of historic economic distress, or was it a repudiation of a big-spending activist government? Was it primarily a failure of communications as the White House has suggested lately, or was it a fundamental disconnect with the values and priorities of the American public?... - NYT, 11-3-10
  • How the tea party helped GOP find a path to Election Day successes: Victories for tea-party candidates Rand Paul, Marco Rubio, and Jim DeMint showed the impact of the nascent conservative movement on the GOP's ability to project a winning posture.... - CS Monitor, 11-2-10
  • Republicans See Big Gains in House: The Tea Party captured its first big victories Tuesday when Marco Rubio won a United States Senate seat in Florida and Rand Paul won his Senate bid in Kentucky. The victories seemed to be a precursor of big gains in Congress for the Republican Party, as victories in several races suggesting the party could be poised to take control of the House of Representatives. The results, and surveys of voters outside polling places, signaled that the elections would recalibrate the balance of power in Washington and in state houses across the nation, as voters distressed over the lingering economic woes, seemed eager to rebuke President Obama and his fellow Democrats.
    The biggest gains for Republicans were expected in the House, where party leaders said they were confident of reclaiming the majority. Several incumbent Democrats were trailing on Ohio, a key indicator of trouble ahead for Democrats.... - NYT, 11-2-10
  • Tea Party Comes to Power on an Unclear Mandate: For all the ways its rank and file despises President Obama, the Tea Party’s powerful insurgency shares this with him: It has been a blank screen on which voters have projected all kinds of hopes and frustrations — not always compatible or realistic.
    As it tries to make the transition from a protest movement to a power on Capitol Hill, the Tea Party faces the challenge of channeling the energy it brought to the election into a governing agenda when it has no clear mandate, a stated distaste for the inevitable compromises of legislating and a wary relationship with Republican leaders in Congress.
    The Republican sweep looked to be largely a Tea Party sweep, with 4 in 10 voters in exit polls expressing support for the movement.... - NYT, 11-2-10
  • West Virginia Senate: a crucial but hollow victory for Democrats?: Gov. Joe Manchin has declared victory in the race for the open West Virginia Senate seat. His win makes it very unlikely that the GOP will control the Senate. But in Washington, Manchin might act more like a Republican than a Democrat.... - CS Monitor, 11-2-10
  • For Obama, perils and opportunities ahead: Facing what seems certain to be a vastly more Republican and hostile Congress, President Obama will begin a new chapter in his presidency following today's midterm elections—one filled both with pitfalls and opportunities as he struggles to enact his policies and prepare to run for reelection in two years. These election results will likely leave Obama in a bind. Enacting measures that he hopes to get passed--such as an expansion of health care to include those left uncovered by last year's landmark legislation or an increase in educational benefits through a plan to aid community colleges--will be more difficult. Those proposals will probably have to be re-crafted or abandoned altogether.... - National Journal, 11-2-10
  • Tea time: GOP nears House control, piling up wins: House control within reach, Republicans piled up gains Tuesday night in a drive to forge a new conservative majority midway through President Barack Obama's term. They added Senate seats, as well, but seemed likely to fall short of taking over."We've come to take our government back," Sen.-elect Rand Paul declared to cheering supporters at a victory party in Bowling Green, Ky., an early Republican winner on a night filled with them. A Republican majority in the House would usher in a new era of divided government as the nation struggles to emerge from the shadow of the worst recession since the 1930s.... - AP, 11-2-10
  • GOP celebrates first fruits of expected big night: Republicans gained a Senate seat in Indiana, and tea party favorite Rand Paul coasted to victory in Kentucky in midterm elections Tuesday night, first fruits of a drive to break the Democrats' grip on power in Congress. Republicans also led for four House seats in Democratic hands and projected confidence they would succeed in winning a majority and installing Rep. John Boehner of Ohio as speaker.... - AP, 11-2-10
  • Why Rand Paul's victory is important: Rand Paul's victory provides evidence that the tea party influence is real, and may hold lessons about negative campaigning.... - CS Monitor, 11-2-10
  • Long Wait Possible in Alaska: Alaska—The winner of Alaska's Senate race might not be known for weeks, as election officials wrestle with complications created by incumbent Lisa Murkowski's write-in effort as well as thousands of absentee ballots. Alaska voters on Tuesday were choosing among Ms. Murkowski, tea-party-favorite and Republican nominee Joe Miller, and Democrat Scott McAdams, a little-known former mayor. In addition to those votes and others cast early, there are at least 20,000 absentee ballots that won't be counted Tuesday night. Election officials will first tally the number of votes for Mr. Miller and Mr. McAdams, and the number of voters who indicated a write-in choice. Alaskans voting for Ms. Murkowski must darken a bubble on the ballot and write her name on a line. If the number of votes with the write-in bubble filled is far lower than those for another candidate, a winner could become apparent Tuesday night. But if write-ins are in first place—or close to it, election officials must wait for laggard absentee ballots to arrive and be counted before moving beyond counting bubbles to actually tallying the names written in next to them. Any name-counting wouldn't start until Nov. 18, and the election wouldn't be certified until around Nov. 29. Only at that point could a candidate contest the results in court, said Gail Fenumiai, director of the state Division of Elections.... - WSJ, 11-2-10


  • Cantor: Democrats 'Didn't Get the Message' From Voters if Pelosi Stays Leader: "If Democratic members in the House elect Nancy Pelosi as their leader, it's almost as if they just didn't get the message from the voters this election. I mean, the voters outright rejected the agenda that she's been about," he said."I mean this is the woman who really, I think, puts ideology first, and there have been no results for the American people. And that seems the direction they want to take again. It just doesn't make sense."
    "I don't think there's any question that this says to the voters, 'We're not listening to you. We think we're right. We're going to continue the same path,'" Cantor said....
    "You're rightly frustrated with the pace of our economic recovery. So am I. You're fed up with partisan politics and you want results. I do, too," he said.... - Fox News, 11-7-10
  • Rep. Mike Pence, the Indiana Republican who is stepping down from his post in GOP leadership: "I think this week's election was a historic rejection of American liberalism and the Obama and Pelosi agenda... The American people are tired of the borrowing, the spending, the bailouts, the takeovers." - AP, 11-7-10
  • Rep. Chris Van Hollen, D-Md., who led the Democratic Congressional Campaign Committee: "It was a very rough week, there's no sugarcoating that.... I don't see any sign of the president retreating from his principles, but I do see his willingness to reach out, and wherever reasonable and in the interests of moving the economy and jobs forward, he's going to work with the Republicans, as are the Democrats," Van Hollen said.... - AP, 11-7-10
  • Rep. Eric Cantor, the Virginia Republican who is in line to become majority leader:"The president did say this week he's willing to work with us. Now listen, are we willing to work with him? First and foremost, we're not going to be willing to work with him on the expansive liberal agenda he's been about."... - AP, 11-7-10
  • Senate Minority Leader Mitch McConnell, R-Ky: "This was a huge, huge issue in the election last Tuesday. A vast majority of Americans feel very, very uncomfortable with this new bill. People who supported us, political independents, want it repealed and replaced with something else. I think we owe it to them to try." ..."Admittedly, it will be difficult with him in the White House," McConnell said."But if we can put a full repeal on his desk and replace it with the kind of commonsense forms that we were advocating during the debate to reduce spending, we owe it to the American people to do that."... - AP, 11-7-10
  • Rep. Paul Ryan, the Wisconsin Republican who will take leadership of the House budget committee, said the GOP will reign in the overhaul through oversight hearings and cutting off money to implement the law,"but then again, the president has to sign those bills, so that is a challenge.""You can't fully repeal and replace this law until you have a new president and a better Senate. And that's probably in 2013, but that's before the law fully kicks in, in 2014," Ryan said.... - AP, 11-7-10
  • 'This Week' Transcript: Rand Paul, Rep. Mike Pence and David Stockman - ABC News, 11-7-10
  • Transcript: McConnell on Face the Nation - Time, 11-7-10
  • Rand Paul, the tea party-backed winner in Kentucky's Senate race: "We're coming. We're proud. We're strong. We're loud. And we're going to co-opt. And, in fact, I think we're already shaping the debate," he said of his fellow tea party candidates.... - AP, 11-7-10
  • Pelosi Urges Unity and Says She Will Work Toward Democratic Rebound:
    November 6, 2010
    Dear Democratic Colleague:
    In the 24 hours since I wrote seeking your views and your vote for Democratic Leader, I have been very gratified by the extensive and enthusiastic support I have received. Many of our colleagues, from all areas of our diverse Caucus, have been generous with their ideas and their support. I am grateful for the confidence that has been placed in me to be House Democratic Leader.
    Our conversations have focused on the difficult challenges facing America’s working families and our important work on their behalf in the 112th Congress. Foremost is the need to create jobs and promote the economic security of the American middle class. In addition, we must build the capacity for effectively communicating our message of job creation and opportunity for all, while supporting our signature achievements of health care, Wall Street reform, and Social Security and Medicare.
    In the 2006 election with our"New Direction" and"6 for '06? message, we spoke with great clarity and unity — and we won. Now we must further modernize not only that message but the way in which we communicate with constituents.
    While we are deeply affected personally and politically by the loss of excellent members of our Caucus, nevertheless we hope those colleagues will continue the fight and rejoin us again in two years. We will begin the 112th Congress with talented new colleagues, and with a renewed dedication to fighting every day for jobs, economic recovery and the middle class.
    Thank you again for your leadership and for your friendship.
    best wishes,
    WaPo, 11-6-10
  • Obama:"Leadership Isn't Just Legislation" After Midterm Defeat, Humbled President Acknowledges Failures in Exclusive"60 Minutes" Interview: "I think that's a fair argument. I think that, over the course of two years we were so busy and so focused on getting a bunch of stuff done that, we stopped paying attention to the fact that leadership isn't just legislation. That it's a matter of persuading people. And giving them confidence and bringing them together. And setting a tone," Mr. Obama told 60 Minutes' Steve Kroft in an exclusive interview set to air Sunday."Making an argument that people can understand," Mr. Obama continued,"I think that we haven't always been successful at that. And I take personal responsibility for that. And it's something that I've got to examine carefully … as I go forward." - CBS News, 11-5-10
  • Obama: Put politics aside to grow economy: "Based on today's jobs report, we've now seen private sector job growth for 10 straight months. That means that since January, the private sector has added 1.1 million jobs," he said at the White House after the Labor Department reported that the economy added 151,000 jobs in October."The most important competition that we face in the new century will not be between Democrats and Republicans. It's the competition with countries around the world to lead the global economy, and our success or failure in this race will depend on whether we can come together as a nation.""Our future depends on putting politics aside to solve problems, to worry about the next generation instead of the next election. We can't spend the next two years mired in gridlock. Other countries like China aren't standing still, so we can't stand still either. We have to move forward." - CNN, 11-5-10
  • Senate Minority Leader Mitch McConnell (R-Ky.) in a speech to the Heritage Foundation: "We have to be realistic about what we can and cannot achieve, while at the same time recognizing that realism should never be confused with capitulation."..."But the fact is ... it would be foolish to expect that Republicans will be able to completely reverse the damage Democrats have done as long as a Democrat holds the veto pen."....He reiterated that his overriding goal is to"deny President Obama a second term in office."
  • Exclusive: Boehner Expects 'Whale of a Fight' With Obama Over Taxes in Lame Duck Session: "We're not in control," Boehner said."And I've not been party to any of these conversations. I'm for extending all of the current tax rates for all Americans."..."The American people want us to find common ground," he said."And I'm hoping that the president heard what the American people had to say the other night." - Fox News, 11-4-10
  • Sarah Palin: The Midterms: Lessons Learned and the Way Forward: Have an intelligent message, and fight for your right to be heard.... - NRO, 11-4-10
  • President Barack Obama, Press Conference: "I've got to do a better job," he said,"like everybody else in Washington." And he took responsibility for not doing enough to alter the ways of the capital, whether its hyper-partisanship or back-room dealing."We were in such a hurry to get things done that we didn't change how things were done."
  • Ohio Rep. John Boehner, the speaker-in-waiting:"Change course we will," describing the outcome as a clear mandate to shrink the government. That echoed the unrelenting demand of tea party activists whose energy and votes helped to fuel the largest turnover in the House in more than 70 years.
    "I think it is important for us to lay the groundwork before we begin to repeal this monstrosity," Boehner said.
  • Rep. Eric Cantor of Virginia, No. 2 Republican in the House:"We've been given a second chance and a golden opportunity." But, he added,"People want to see results."
  • Senate Majority Leader Harry Reid, who survived a tea party challenge in Nevada:"I'm ready for some tweaking" on the health care law but would fight its repeal.
    "If we need to work something out with the people who are really rich, I'll have to look at that," he said."If there's some tweaking we need to do with the health care bill, I'm ready for some tweaking. But I'm not going to in any way denigrate the great work we did as a country, and saving America from bankruptcy because of the insurance industry bankrupting us."
  • Sarah Palin via Twitter: "As always, proud to be American! Thanks, Commonsense Constitutional Conservatives, u didn't sit down & shut up...u"refudiated" extreme left"—so tweeted Sarah Palin on Election Night, demonstrating characteristic optimism in the face of what was decidedly a mixed bag for her politically.... Palin tweeted on Tuesday about the media, and specifically the Today Show:"Silly fellas! Chucky, remember, I'm not on ballot."
  • Rick Scott FLA Gov (R):"There were plenty of pundits, politicians and insiders who said this victory was impossible. But the people of Florida knew exactly what they wanted. They sent a message loud and clear: they said, let's get to work."
  • Rep. John Boehner, R-Ohio, who is poised to become the new speaker of the House: "Americans have sent an unmistakable message … tonight, and that message is: Change course." Boehner acknowledged that his party's ability to set the nation's path will be limited with Democrats still in power in the Senate and the White House."It's the president who sets the agenda for our government," he said...."The American people were concerned about the government takeover of health care," he said."I think it's important for us to lay the groundwork before we begin to repeal this monstrosity."
  • Rep. Eric Cantor, R-Va., in line to take over as House majority leader, said the driving issue in his party's success was the economy: "Jobs first," he said in describing the GOP's priorities. Rolling back Obama's health care initiative also will be a goal, he said."There's no question, last night indicated again that the majority of Americans want to see the repeal of Obamacare."..."I hope that we're able to put a repeal bill on the floor right away because that's what the American people want," he said Tuesday night."They understand that this bill is going to bankrupt this country and take away the health care that they -- most people in this country -- know and like."
  • STATEMENT FROM RNC CHAIRMAN MICHAEL STEELE ON THE PENNSYLVANIA ELECTIONS: Tonight, the Keystone State delivered a resounding repudiation of the reckless tax, borrow and spend agenda of Democrats in Washington and in Harrisburg. Pennsylvania voters have chosen principled, fiscally responsible leadership by electing Tom Corbett, Pat Toomey, and five new Republican members of Congress, who will work to help fix the economy and get Pennsylvanians back to work.
    These Republican wins are proof that the real catalysts for change in this country are the grassroots activists in small towns across the nation and the millions of families looking to earn an honest living and pursue the American dream. Through the tremendous leadership of the Pennsylvania Republican Party and support of an unprecedented Victory effort of twenty-six offices and twenty-seven dedicated staff, we were able to communicate our Party’s message, identify voters, get our supporters to the polls, and deliver Republican victories across the state.
    I would like to congratulate Pat Toomey, Tom Corbett, and all of our federal and state legislative Republican candidates across Pennsylvania for their successful campaigns for limited government and fiscal responsibility. It is time for our nation and Pennsylvania to get back to work and leaders such as Pat Toomey and Tom Corbett will be on the frontlines to ensure that we do.
  • Details on President Obama's call the House Republican leader John Boehner from the AP: "During what Boehner described as a brief but pleasant midnight conversation, the two discussed working together on priorities for Americans. Boehner says he told the president that the people expect them to cut spending and create jobs."
  • House Republican Leader John Boehner is speaking:"Listen, I'll be brief, because we have real work to do ?" and this is not a time for celebration … not when one in 10 of our fellow citizens are out of work ...not when we have buried our children under a mountain of debt … not when our Congress is held in such low esteem.? of our fellow citizens are out of work … not when we have buried our children under a mountain of debt … not when our Congress is held in such low esteem."
  • New York Democratic Gov.-elect Andrew Cuomo seemed to be speaking to Tea Partiers in his acceptance speech: He said,"You are not going to separate us, you can try that somewhere else, but not in New York." He acknowledged that he and his party had work to do to rebuild trust with voters. But he asserted that"politics were over, we are going to be more united than ever before."
  • MARCO RUBIO'S WORD OF CAUTION: Marco Rubio tempered his acceptance speech in the Florida Senate race with a word of caution to his fellow Republicans. He said,"Even now, the stories are being written about what this really means. The House of Representatives will change hands, and a growing number of Republicans will also serve in the Senate. But we will make a grave mistake if we think this is an embrace of the Republican Party." Instead he said, it was"a second chance" for his party"to be what we were meant to be."
  • Republican Cantor vows to repeal health reform: Representative Eric Cantor, who is likely to become majority leader in the new Republican-led House of Representatives, vowed on Tuesday to repeal healthcare reform and cut federal spending."We will get to work right away to reduce the deficit by cutting federal spending next year down to 2008 levels. That will save $100 billion in the first year alone," he said, according to prepared remarks.... - Reuters, 11-2-10
  • HOUSE Democratic National Committee Chairman Tim Kaine said: Democratic loses in the House, especially loses in his home state of Virginia, were"very tough.""We wanted to hold on to both [chambers of Congress] especially because we have had a great Speaker in Speaker Pelosi."Speaking to reporters at Democratic headquarters, Kaine quickly turned to the optimistic view that Democrats will retain control of the Senate."We remain confident we will have a strong showing and keep the majority," he said.Refusing to offer what he called a post-mortem of the night, Kaine said the night's results point to the need for both sides of the aisle to cooperate and listen to the American public."Maybe it is a message from the American public," he said."We have a Democrat in the White House; we'll have maybe a majority of Republican governors; we'll have a Democratic Senate; Republican House: everyone has to work together and that is what I know the president will focus on."
  • Christine O'Donnell Concession Speech: In her concession speech, Delaware Republican Senate candidate Christine O'Donnell gave no ground in defeat. She said she had just gotten off the phone with her opponent, Democrat Chris Coons."And I warned him that he was now in a position to help the people who are suffering ... I asked him if he would fight to stop the death tax from being reinstated this Jan. 1." She added,"We can only hope and pray that he chooses to go against his party and do what is right for the people of Delaware." She vowed to continue fighting for her positions."Our elected officials will be held accountable to their constituents, like it or not."
  • Rand Paul: KY SENATE: In his acceptance speech in Bowling Green, Ky., Republican Rand Paul called his win part of a"Tea Party tidal wave." He said,"The American people are unhappy with what is going on in Washington. Tonight ... we are sending a message to them."
  • HOUSE: Rep. Chris Van Hollen, chairman of the Democratic Congressional Campaign Committee, was defiantly optimistic about his party's chances to retain control of the house.Speaking to reporters at the Democratic headquarters shortly after 9, he rebuffed NBC News' Norah O'Donnell when she said her network had already called Republicans had won a majority in the House."Well, I think that is a mistake. That is way too early," he said. and again I think that is a mistake and I think what you are seeing right now is voters going to polls and the verdict is out still.""Democratic turnout has been higher than projected," Van Hollen said."Obviously we had a good early vote and we are seeing stronger than projected democratic turnout in races so far. Obviously there are a lot of polls around the country that has not closed yet in the mountain region and the West Coast. but we knew it would be challenging." Moments after he walked out of the room CNN also called control of the House for Republicans. Van Hollen's words seemed to be a final cry for hope:"We remain confident we will have a strong showing and keep the majority."
  • Obama says post-election agenda hinges on having allies: President Barack Obama said the fate of his policy agenda would depend on having allies in Congress as he pressed supporters to turn out and vote in a bid to minimize his Democrats' losses in Tuesday's congressional elections."Everybody who is listening: Just remember, the future is yours to shape. But if you don't get involved, somebody is going to shape it for you ... one of the best ways to do that is to vote today," Obama said in an interview on Los Angeles radio station KPWR.
    With the midterm elections shaping up as a referendum on his first two years, Obama insisted his administration had accomplished a lot after taking office in the midst of the worst financial crisis in decades. He cited a return to economic growth -- albeit slow and halting -- plus a sweeping healthcare overhaul and a U.S. troop drawdown in Iraq among his achievements. Obama acknowledged that job growth is slower than it needs to be but said he would keep the focus on reducing unemployment as well as improving education."Across the board, things have gotten better over the last two years. We can only keep it up if I've got some friends and allies in Congress and statehouses," Obama, speaking from the Oval Office, said on the youth-oriented radio station's whose slogan is"Where hip hop lives." Reuters, 11-2-10


  • Richard Norton Smith: Voters to Republicans: Don't Get Too Comfortable: "Let's face it," says Richard Norton Smith, a history professor at George Mason University, the outcome"is schizophrenic." He says voters demand change, then punish lawmakers who made change possible. Voters insist they want representatives who work across the aisle, yet reward the ones who make sure that doesn't happen."They claim to want to address fundamental issues, including the budget deficit, but don't want to take the costly steps to get us there," says Smith.... - Business Week, 11-4-10
  • Gil Troy: Obama 2.0 Must Lead from the Center Humbly and Substantively: The American voters gave President Barack Obama a good, old-fashioned political whupping on Tuesday. It was a stunning political reversal as Mr. Yes We Can became Mr. Why Can't They Understand and Appreciate Me? President Barack Obama must learn his lesson from this political drubbing. To redeem his presidency, he must do what he originally promised to do, lead from the center—humbly and substantively....
    Obama still has the time and the national good will to recover. Most Republican campaign commercials targeted Nancy Pelosi, or Harry Reid, or big government, not the president. This nuance reflected Obama's personal popularity, despite his 55 percent negative job approval rating. Moreover, the economy could still revive, unemployment could fall, the Republicans could self-destruct by misreading this election as an invitation to showcase their extremists.
    Political greatness, in fact personal greatness, does not come from winning all the time, but from knowing how to turn devastating defeats into incredible opportunities. The true test of Barack Obama the man and the president has begun. - HNN, 11-4-10
  • Tevi Troy: Secondary Purge: Politico has a piece on an expected shakeup of the White House staff in the wake of the Democrats’ historic election defeat. This may be a good idea, but it’s important to remember that the White House has already engaged in one of the more extensive White House staff shakeups in recent memory, replacing the chief of staff, the head of the National Economic Council, the national security adviser, and the head of the Council of Economic Advisers over the last few months. The election debacle may prompt more heads to roll, but purging more staffers will not solve the White House’s problems.... - NRO, 11-4-10
  • Obama's 'shellacking' puts his legacy in jeopardy: "It was conciliatory and rambling. He was flailing to find issues to compromise on," said Princeton University public affairs professor Julian E. Zelizer."It wasn’t the image of someone who’s decisive and in control." The president by nature is a consensus seeker, Zelizer said."He's not totally comfortable with the political part of the job." The more Obama leans toward the center to appease the Republicans, however, the more he risks alienating his liberal base. In that case, Secretary of State Hillary Clinton — who wisely stayed off the stump this election season — may become a more viable 2012 presidential candidate for the Democrats, Zelizer said.... - AMNY, 11-4-10
  • Rick Perlstein: How Obama Enables Rush: We live in a mendocracy. As in: rule by liars. Political scientists are going crazy crunching the numbers to uncover the skeleton key to understanding the Republican victory last Tuesday. - The Daily Beast (11-6-10)
  • Allan Lichtman: The Joyless Election: ...[N]ever before in the history of the United States has such a sweeping victory by one political party elicited so little joy and such minimal expectations. The American voters rejected the leadership of the Democratic Party that controlled the presidency and both Houses of Congress.... Above all, this year voters repudiated the government of the United States. This is the third consecutive election in which the voters ousted the party in power. However, dissatisfaction with government extends more deeply into the American past.... - (MD) (11-5-10)
  • David M. Kennedy: Throwing the Bums Out for 140 Years: SO we have had three “wave” elections in a row: control of both chambers of Congress changed hands in 2006, as did the presidency in 2008, and the House flipped back to Republican domination last week. All this apparently incoherent back-and-forth has left the political class reeling and set the commentariat aflutter. Explanations for our current political volatility abound: toxic partisanship, the ever more fragmented and strident news media, high unemployment, economic upheaval and the clamorous upwelling of inchoate populist angst. But the political instability of our own time pales when compared with the late 19th century. In the Gilded Age the American ship of state pitched and yawed on a howling sea of electoral turbulence. For decades on end,"divided government" was the norm. In only 12 of the 30 years after 1870 did the same party control the House, the Senate and the White House.... - NYT (11-7-10)
  • Daniel K. Williams: A Victory for the Christian Right: Immediately after the 2010 midterm elections, the National Right to Life Committee declared the results a victory for the pro-life cause, claiming that 65 seats in Congress had switched from pro-choice to pro-life. The Family Research Council likewise declared that voters had soundly rejected President Barack Obama’s efforts to allow gays to serve openly in the military. Voters in Iowa recalled three state Supreme Court justices who had ruled in favor of same-sex marriage. Across the nation, Christian conservatives claimed victories for their cultural causes after seeing Tuesday’s election results. Why, then, did most of the media—and the Republican Party leadership—say so little about religion in the election analysis?.... - PBS (11-5-10)
  • Robert Dallek: The Long View of the Tea Party: Regardless of how many seats change hands in the election, one result is already clear: The tea party movement will, for the immediate future, influence the direction of the Republican Party.... - Politico (11-4-10)
  • Alan Brinkley: Obama vs. Tea Party: Think FDR vs. Huey Long: In the aftermath of the massive Democratic losses on Election Day, the tea party movements have proved that their efforts made a significant contribution to the Republican victories. Though only a few true tea party candidates were actually elected — most prominently Rand Paul in Kentucky and Marco Rubio in Florida — there can be no doubt that the movement’s energy and anger were perhaps the crucial factor.... - Politico (11-4-10)
  • Steven M. Gillon: The Lessons of 1994: Democrats are still absorbing the electoral drubbing they suffered at the polls this week. As the New York Times reported, nearly every congressional district in America voted more Republican in 2010 than in 2008. Republicans rode a wave of well-financed and carefully orchestrated (but no less genuine) public anger at a struggling economy that shows little signs of improving. Gleeful conservative pundits are already predicting that the election marked the beginning of the end of the Obama presidency. Dispirited Democrats worry they may be right. But are they?... - Huffington Post (11-4-10)
  • Victor Davis Hanson: America Just Checked into Rehab: On Tuesday, voters rejected President Obama’s attempt to remake America in the image of an imploding Europe — not just by overwhelmingly electing Republican candidates to the House, but by preferring dozens of maverick conservatives who ran against the establishment. Why the near-historic rebuke? Out-of-control spending, unchecked borrowing, vast new entitlements, and unsustainable debt — all at a time of economic stagnation. So what is next? Like the recovering addict who checks himself into rehab, a debt-addicted America just snapped out of its borrowing binge, is waking up with the shakes, and hopes there is still a chance of recovery.... - National Review (11-4-10)
  • Historic Perspective on Republican Shift: Presidential historian Michael Beschloss, Richard Norton Smith of George Mason University and Beverly Gage of Yale University examine the results of Tuesday's midterm election in the context of races past.... - PBS Newshour, 11-4-10 - Mp3
  • MICHAEL BESCHLOSS, presidential historian: I think we can stamp this one with historic.... But I think, in this case, it has the added advantage of being true, as they say in Texas -- was historic for a couple of reasons. One is, the Obama presidency is unlikely to be the same again. The things he was able to do with control of Congress, it is going to be very different now that he's lost one house. Also, you don't usually see a wave of this magnitude, hasn't happened quite like this in at least a half-century. So, the American people were obviously saying something very powerful, very different from what they said two years ago.... - PBS Newshour, 11-4-10
  • BEVERLY GAGE, assistant professor, Yale University: I do agree. And I would say that, looking back to this half-century, we really want to look at 1946 as a really good example of a moment where a midterm actually was a sea change. And I think it's an interesting model, going back to what we were saying with the health care debate, which is that, in 1946, there was a lot of talk about labor law, and, as this new Republican Congress came in under a Democratic president, they actually managed to do something significant. They didn't repeal the labor laws that had been passed during the New Deal, but they did actually succeed in passing new laws like Taft-Hartley, that severely restricted the kinds of legislations that they had been objecting to for upwards of a decade at that point.... - PBS Newshour, 11-4-10
  • RICHARD NORTON SMITH, scholar in residence, George Mason University: Let me think about that. 1930, of course, Herbert Hoover had been sold to the American people as this un -- non- politician, the hero of World War 1 who defended Belgium and the rest of the world, never run for office before. Both parties wanted to make him president in 1920. The slogan was,"Who but Hoover?" He was elected in 1928 with very high expectations. And then, of course, Wall Street collapses. And, in 1930, the Democrats come within a whisker of taking over the House. And then, through a series of bi-elections, they actually take the House. And there's no doubt that they stopped Hoover's program cold... ... and enshrined Hoover in public memory to this day as a man who is synonymous not with feeding people, but denying, in effect, government aid to victims of the Depression.... PBS Newshour, 11-4-10
  • Michael Beschloss: Historian Predicts Obama Will Be Reelected Despite Midterm Election Results (VIDEO): 'The Daily Show' (weeknights, 11PM ET on COM) partnered with 'The Colbert Report' for 'Indecision 2010' on election night, offering viewers live coverage of the midterm results. Jon Stewart noted that it's standard practice for the nation's ruling party to"lose some seats" in midterm elections. However, presidential historian Michael Beschloss admitted they don't usually lose this many seats.
    But if history repeats itself, he had some good news for President Obama."The three presidents in recent times who have had midterm loss like this have been Truman, Eisenhower, Bill Clinton. Every single one of them got reelected.""So your thought is, 'What a great night for Barack Obama!'" joked Stewart. - TV Squad, 11-3-10
  • Tevi Troy Visiting Senior Fellow, the Hudson Institute, How does Obama explain the GOP landslide?: President Obama has a lot of explaining to do. He came into office with a great deal of goodwill, strong majorities in both houses of Congress, and an opposition party in complete disarray. Less than two years later, the goodwill and the House majority are gone, and Republicans are resurgent. It will not be possible to make complete amends in a single press conference, but he can start by signaling a move to the middle and a willingness to work in a more bipartisan manner.... - Politico
  • Julian Zelizer: As the GOP Gains Control of the House, What Does the Party Have to Do? John Boehner Expected to Become Next Speaker of the House: "[Boehner's] first challenge is to control the rebels," said Julian Zelizer, political analyst and professor of politics at Princeton University."Some of the ideological division we see will be because of the Tea Party types, but also just because of freshmen determined to show they're not part of the status quo."
    "The Republicans don't want to look like a whole cohort of Christine O'Donnell's came to town," said Zelizer referring to the losing Tea Party candidate who admitted during the campaign she once dabbled in witchcraft."Maverick outsiders who are good at attack politics but who are not necessarily politicians who can't handle the responsibilities of the office."
    "Boehner has to make sure that's not the image that people are left with in two years," said Zelizer.
    "The GOP really needs to decide whether their strategy is to try to obtain some legislation that their supporters would like or to focus on a strategy on pure obstruction and grandstanding. Both have dangers and benefits," Zelizer said.... - ABC News, 11-3-10
  • Julian E. Zelizer: Is it 1994 all over again?: Republicans effectively gained control over Congress on Tuesday. The GOP won a majority of seats in the House of Representatives, thus overturning the gains Democrats made in 2006 and 2008.
    In the Senate, where the procedural power of the minority has already given Republicans the power to shape deliberations, the narrowed Democratic ranks will further weaken the majority.
    In the weeks running up to the election, there were some commentators who concluded that the current situation would be the best outcome for President Obama.
    Pointing to the example of the 1994 midterms, which gave Republicans control of Congress, they have argued that a bad outcome for Democrats would ironically allow Obama to regain his standing. Obama could use Republicans as a foil to attack extremism -- just as Clinton did with Speaker Newt Gingrich in 1995 and 1996 -- and he would have political cover and incentives to move closer toward the center, where voters would like him more....
    Now, with 2012 over the horizon, the GOP will have more incentives to oppose the president. Indeed, Sen. Mitch McConnell, leader of the Senate Republicans, recently said:"The single most important thing we want to achieve is for President Obama to be a one-term president."
    At the same time, Obama faces a significant risk if he tries to appease Republicans in Clinton-like fashion. After all, many liberals are already frustrated with the kinds of compromises Obama has made. Going too far -- for example, declaring that the era of big government is over -- could trigger a challenge to the president in the Democratic primaries.
    We should hope that the United States is not about to live through a repeat performance of what occurred after 1994. The nation faces too many pressing economic and foreign policy problems to have that happen again. - CNN, 11-3-10
  • Paul Green, Roosevelt University political science professor and commentator Election 2010: Will gridlock be election fallout?: "The election really doesn't make a difference. Everything will be held up. Bipartisanship has become a code word for political treason." - Daily Journal, 11-3-10
  • David Claborn, Olivet Nazarene University associate professor of political science and history Election 2010: Will gridlock be election fallout?: "We voted against a party and a status quo, not necessarily for the people who won. I don't think the election has given us much of a clue as to what will happen." - Daily Journal, 11-3-10
  • Jacob Weisberg: Faking Right How the Republican Congress will abandon Tea Party ideas and legislate toward the center: In the likely event that Republicans capture control of one or both houses of Congress next week, the new leaders will face a strategic question. Should they pursue the agenda of the Tea Party movement that brought them to power? Or should they try to mollify their party's base with gestures and symbols, without taking its radical ideology too seriously? While they'll never discuss this problem honestly, indications point in the latter direction. That is, the GOP's congressional leadership will feint right while legislating closer to the center.
    The choice is between a Ronald Reagan strategy and a Newt Gingrich strategy. Reagan, who first rode a new conservative movement to the presidency in 1980, was a master of the right fake. After one brief and disastrous attempt to reduce Social Security spending in 1981, Reagan never seriously challenged federal spending again. But Reagan sounded so convincing in his rhetorical flights that most conservatives and liberals walk around today thinking that he cut government. Reagan was just as slippery with the religious right, embracing them while wasting little political capital on issues like abortion or school prayer. President George W. Bush followed this same model, humoring the base while letting government expand.... - Slate, 11-3-10
  • A deeply divided government is tasked with building consensus: "There isn’t going to be a candidate around which they can unify all factions of the party," University of New Hampshire political science professor Dante Scala offered. “For all the talk from the Republican elite about unifying, I wonder if it’s already too late."...
    "The President may go the Bill Clinton route to build up his centrist credentials," Prof. Scala said."If that’s the case, a lot of [progressive] House Democrats will be put in cold storage for a couple of years."... - The Globe & Mail, 11-2-10
  • Julian Zelizer: Le Congrès, acteur central de la politique américaine: C'est dû au pouvoir que le Congrès accorde au «parti perdant au Sénat», explique Julian Zelizer, professeur de science politique à l'université de Princeton. La minorité d'opposition peut en effet décider de bloquer un projet de loi, en se livrant à la pratique de l'obstruction systématique (filibuster). Seule une majorité sénatoriale des deux tiers peut mettre fin au blocage. Le Congrès dispose d'autres «instruments» considérables pour borner et contrôler le pouvoir exécutif, puisqu'il tient les cordons de la bourse et peut décider de limiter le budget, note Zelizer. Il peut enterrer des projets législatifs et dispose aussi d'un rôle d'enquête très important grâce à ses puissantes commissions parlementaires et autres commissions ad hoc. - Le Figaro, 1-2-10
  • Stefan Zaklin: Bush Is Back Why Republicans and Democrats alike are about to contract a serious case of Bush nostalgia: Nostalgia is a powerful force in American politics. Consider this year’s midterm elections. Democrats wanted to return to the Clinton years, when budgets were balanced and the economy was booming. Glenn Beck and his Tea Party followers yearned for a time before Woodrow Wilson. And while the rest of the Republican Party didn’t pledge to take the country back quite as far—the 1950s, for example, would do just fine—it still pledged to take the country back. For a lot of people, the past is preferable to the present.
    But is our penchant for political pining expansive enough to encompass someone as seemingly irredeemable as, say, George W. Bush?
    We’re about to find out. When Bush retired in 2009, the near consensus was that he—like the Vietnam War, the Teapot Dome scandal, or Millard Fillmore—was nostalgia-proof. The national debt stood at $11.3 trillion, more than double what it was when he took office. The economy hadn’t been so bad since the Great Depression. Inherited surpluses equal to 2.5 percent of GDP had become deficits equal to 3 percent of GDP. And Americans were still dying in two wars—one neglected, the other inexplicable. In Rolling Stone, historian Sean Wilentz awarded Bush the title of “worst president in history.” Many voters agreed: his final approval ratings hovered around 22 percent, a near-record low.
    What You Missed: Midterm Elections in 7 Minutes Haven't been paying attention this election season? Here's everything you need to know in brief
    Over the next few months, however, the thinking on Bush is likely to be challenged. In fact, some voters—and politicians—might even find themselves longing for a return to the Inauspicious Aughties. In part that’s because the former president is releasing a memoir of his time in office, Decision Points, on Nov. 9. After nearly two years of silence, he’ll headline the Miami Book Fair, appear on Oprah, and enjoy the predictable softening of public sentiment that comes when an embattled figure emerges from the wilderness and starts spending a lot of time to promote his side of the story. But there’s a bigger reason that Bush nostalgia is about to become a very real phenomenon inside and outside the Beltway: the Tea Party. As far-right rookies like Rand Paul, Sharron Angle, and Ken Buck begin to arrive on Capitol Hill, as they’re expected to, both mainstream Republicans and Democrats will realize that, whatever their disagreements with him—real or fabricated—Dubya and his ilk would be far more constructive partners in governing than the new kids on the block.... - Newsweek, 11-2-10
  • A Conservative Victory for Now: The date was March 20, 1981 and Ronald Reagan who had taken the oath of office for his first term just three months earlier was addressing a joint meeting of the American Conservative Union, Young Americans for Freedom, the National Review and Human events.
    It was a very different era. Many of the youth in the audience were members of Generation X, born 1965 through 1980, and Reagan would be in office as Generation Y debuted in 1981 through 1995. Spanning those generations was one that would fill out the present demographic of today’s senior citizens, a critical voting bloc; one that can recall Reagan’s values and hopes to see them restored....
    For Reagan, the conservative goal was"to restore to their rightful place in our national consciousness the values of family, work, neighborhood, and religion" and he warned that it will not be achieved"by those who set people against people, class against class, or institution against institution."
    That was and is a perfect description of Barack Obama and a Democratic Party that knows no other way of governing and has no faith in the people.
    Reagan never lost faith in the American people even though, for a while, they have been forgetful of the past, backsliding from the goals set by the Founding Fathers, robbed and wronged, but who are ready to rise again and restore America.... - Canada Free Press, 11-1-10
  • History Lessons: Midterms as Political Referendum: BEVERLY GAGE, professor, Yale University: Well, midterm elections, historically, are almost always overshadowed by presidential elections. We tend to think in terms of presidents. But they have played really critical roles at some really key moments in American history. And the moments where they have been most important have largely been when two things happened. The first is when either the Senate or the House or both of them have changed hands from one party to another, most often, because it's a midterm election, from the president's party to the opposite.
    And the second is when these party changes happen at moments where really critical issues are at stake. A couple of examples that come to mind, 1918, you see a switch in the Senate in particular under Woodrow Wilson. They scotch his plans for the League of Nations.
    Another significant midterm election, 1946, Harry Truman has just become president. You begin to get real Republican pushback against New Deal policies and against Harry Truman's domestic agenda.....
    Woodrow Wilson notoriously handled it incredibly poorly. By the time he's at the end of World War I, he's had a stroke.
    But he also, in particular, took this Republican repudiation deeply personally. He refused to work with them. And it really ruined a lot of his plans. Presidents who can step back a little bit, take it a little bit less personally, and try to negotiate some sort of compromise tend to do a little bit better in those sorts of scenarios.
    I do think the 1934 election is an interesting parallel to look at. It's, on the one hand, quite exceptional, because the Democrats, under Franklin Roosevelt, actually pick up so many seats that year.
    But, given that Obama was in fact being so roundly compared to Franklin Roosevelt when he was elected -- we were going to have another New Deal in the midst of economic crisis -- I do think it's worth asking why the repudiation of Obama has been quite as severe as it is, and why he couldn't capitalize, like Roosevelt did in 1934.
    We said, it's an exceptional moment, certainly, but, given all of those earlier comparisons, I think it's worth thinking about. - PBS Newshour, 10-27-10
  • History Lessons: Midterms as Political Referendum: RICHARD NORTON SMITH, scholar in residence, George Mason University: I would add, it certainly is a historical trend. In the last 100 years, only twice, has a president, his party in power added seats in...
    The first -- in the two years, halfway through the first term, in 1934, FDR at the height of the New Deal. And then, in 2002, George W. Bush defied the odds in the wake of 9/11, and Republicans actually picked up seats.
    Now, the real curse in American party politics is the six-year curse. Six years into a president's term, it's Katy bar the door. But the fact is, two years... He's a lame duck. He's probably intellectually spent....
    It is increasingly so (a referendum), I think particularly in the modern media age. I mean, one of the interesting things is, for 40 years, the Democrats had the House, from early '50s until '94. The Republicans then took the House and held on to it for 12 years. The Democrats took the House back in 2006. If they lose it on Tuesday, they will have had it for four years.
    There's something going on here. The period of one-party dominance has been shrinking measurably. And I think that's in part because of the emphasis we place on the executive. We have personalized these elections. They're not localized. This is -- for lots of people, this is a referendum on Barack Obama.
    And it's not just the angry anti-Obama forces. If you're on the left, and you are disappointed in this administration for whatever reason, you can express your disappointment by not voting. And that is a significant fact. That's the source of the enthusiasm gap, I think, that we have heard about all year....
    And, if you have lost your job, you're depressed. There's no doubt that there are lots people in this country who are hurting. More than that, there is this pervasive -- I think pervasive fear that the future may not be what Americans traditionally have assumed it to be.
    There's a clear fear of China. There's a sense that this is a country and a culture that may be in the decline. But, in terms of 1934, it was an affirmation of, in a sense, the radicalization that was in 1932. FDR took government places that no president had before. And, by 1934, people felt, psychologically at least, whatever the economic indices were, things were getting better. And so they endorsed him.
    This time around, we didn't go over the cliff."It could have been worse" is not a banner that millions of people are going to march behind to the polls. But, in effect, that's the Obama argument. The argument is, if you listen to the economists, eight million jobs were not lost because of the hated bailouts and TARP and all the other stuff, many of which are Bush initiatives....
    And I think it complicates -- it's a very difficult message that Obama has to deliver...
    I would say he has company, yes. The conventional wisdom is, Bill Clinton brilliantly stole Republican clothes.
    He actually turned this to his advantage by co-opting the center and by waiting for the Republicans to overreach, the shutdown of the government, and et cetera.
    But, I mean, he moved to a balanced budget. He signed the welfare reform package. And so, by '96....
    Republican ideas. He basically shut the door on Bob Dole or any Republican candidate. The question is whether Barack Obama, in today's media climate, with the left on the blogosphere holding his feet to the fire, whether he has as much latitude if he wants to move to the center that Bill Clinton had. PBS Newshour, 10-27-10

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