Historians for Peace and Democracy publishes five Broadsides for the Trump Era

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tags: Trump



Historians for Peace and Democracy (H-PAD) is pleased to announce the publication of five broadsides, collectively called Broadsides for the Trump Era. You can access them on the H-PAD website, here. This is a new series of brief, printable handouts that summarize important historical events, movements, crises, and more that form the backdrop for our current political situation. And please check back at this site for additions in the near future!

The five broadsides, their authors, and a short summary of each is below.

Geoff Eley is a professor of history at the University of Michigan, Ann Arbor. His broadside, “Is Trump a Fascist?“ addresses this question and draws on historical comparisons to determine what fascism is, and whether or not the current administration is, indeed, fascist.

Linda Gordon is a professor of history and a University Professor of Humanities at New York University. Her broadside explores “The Ku Klux Klan of the 1920s” and examines what the Klan was, its ideology, constituency, use of violence, and accomplishments, and women and the Klan. 

Jeremy Kuzmarov, is the Jay P. Walker assistant professor of history at the University of Tulsa.  His broadside explores the political myths, interests, and impact of the “The U.S. War on Drugs”from its origins in the 1910s to today.

Robert Oppenheim is an associate professor in the Center for East Asian Center Studies at the University of Texas at Austin. His broadside “North Korea and Nuclear Weapons” discusses why North Korea developed nuclear weapons, the potential for eliminating or slowing its production of them, and whether or not North Korean has cheated on nuclear agreements.

Ellen Schrecker is a retired professor of American history at Yeshiva University. Her broadside, “McCarthyism, 1947-1960,” answers key questions about McCarthyism, such as what was it, who sponsored it, how did it end, and what were the long-lasting results.

Read entire article at Historians for Peace and Democracy

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